The First Art Newspaper on the Net   Established in 1996 United States Wednesday, February 26, 2020


Perrotin Paris opens an exhibition of new works by New York-based artist Daniel Arsham
View of the exhibition “3020” at Perrotin Paris Photo: Claire Dorn © Courtesy of the artist and Perrotin.


PARIS.- Perrotin Paris is presenting Paris, 3020, an exhibition of new works by New York-based artist Daniel Arsham, on view from January 11 through March 21, 2020.

For this exhibition, Daniel Arsham presents a new suite of large-scale sculptures based on iconic busts, friezes and sculptures in the round from classical antiquity. Over the past year, Arsham has been granted unprecedented access to the Réunion des Musées Nationaux – Grand Palais (RMN), a 200-year-old French molding atelier that reproduces masterpieces for several of Europe’s major encyclopedic museums. Arsham was able to use molds and scans of some of the most iconic works from the collections of the Musée du Louvre in Paris, Acropolis Museum in Athens, the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna and the San Pietro in Vincoli as source material for this new body of work. Interested in the way that objects move through time, the works selected by Arsham are so iconic that they have eclipsed their status as mere art object, and instead have embedded themselves into our collective memory and identity.

Ranging from Michelangelo’s Moses to the Vénus de Milo, each item was cast in hydrostone to produce a perfect to scale replica of the original sculpture, a process that shares formal qualities with historic wax casting. Arsham utilizes natural pigments that are similar to those used by classical sculptors, such as volcanic ash, blue calcite, selenite, quartz, and rose quartz. From that, individual erosions are chiseled into the surface of the hydrostone, a nod to the sculpting techniques of the Renaissance sculptors. Finally, Arsham applies his signature tactic of crystallization.

Arsham is best known for visually transforming ready-made objects of the last half century into subtly eroding artifacts. Historically, he has focused on items that act as containers of memory: an original Apple computer, a Mickey Mouse phone, or Leica cameras. Arsham’s exploration into fictional archaeology dates back to nearly a decade ago when he took a research trip to Easter Island in the South Pacific. There, he observed an archeological expedition of a Moai statue. Around the base of the sculpture, archeologists uncovered tools left behind by a previous archeological expedition from almost a century prior. Inspired by the dissolution of time between these distinct landscapes, Arsham began to explore the idea of archeology as a fictionalized account of the past, as well as a tool with which to collapse the past and the present. This concept has become a common thread throughout his practice. Making use of classical and ancient objects, this new body of work experiments with the timelessness of certain symbols, furthering Arsham’s previous investigations into objecthood.

For Paris, 3020, Arsham borrows display strategies from the modern museum, including elevated plinths, dimmed lights, and a series of nested exhibition spaces. By appropriating the visual language of the encyclopedic museum, Arsham makes deliberate reference to how museums have showcased and shaped object history, specifically as a vehicle that canonizes objects within a greater narrative of progress.

In the first room of the exhibition, visitors encounter two large-scale iconic works of classical antiquity that depict women, specifically the goddess Aphrodite and Lucilla, the daughter of Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius, which are respectively titled Vénus d’Arles and Tête de Lucille. Moving into the next room, Arsham continues his ongoing reference to the great works of Western Art, with an eroded version of Michelangelo’s Moses on one end of the wall and the Vénus de Milo on the other. Both are flanked by a series of busts and life-size sculptures, including the bust of Caracalla wearing a breastplate and the Athéna Casquée, with both pairings highlighting how the ancient world conflated royalty and deity. Flanking the sculptural works are a series of graphite process drawings by Arsham depicting eroded icons of classical antiquity.

These drawings both reference Arsham’s background in fine art as well as the art historical tradition of sketching, providing a fictionalized creation myth for works that seemingly were never meant to exist. Displayed together, these new works are transformed to compress time, at once referencing the past, informing the present, and reaching towards a crystallized future.

Daniel Arsham (b. 1980) lives and works in New York. Arsham has held solo exhibitions at the HOW Museum, Shanghai, China; Cranbrook Art Museum, Detroit, MI; Moco Museum, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia; and the Contemporary Art Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. His group exhibitions include The New Museum, New York, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, USA MoMA PS1, New York, USA. He is in the collections of the Pérez Art Museum Miami, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and the Centre Pompidou in Paris. In 2008, along with Alex Mustonen, Arsham co-founded Snarkitecture, a collaborative practice known for using everyday materials in unexpected ways to create captivating public installations. Rizzoli recently released a comprehensive monograph of Arsham’s work.






Today's News

January 14, 2020

Restituted artworks by Pissarro and Signac to make auction debut in London

Jitish Kallat opens solo exhibition at the Famous Studio in Mumbai

Maria Hummer-Tuttle and Robert Tuttle make transformative gift to Getty Museum

Exhibition rethinks mid-century abstract art in Middle East and beyond

Exhibition at the Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art explores Tullio Crali's entire career

David Zwirner opens an exhibition of work by artist Ruth Asawa at the gallery's London location

Critical financial situation at the Museu de Arte do Rio

Gerald Peters Contemporary exhibits works by Clay Vorhes and Roger Winter

RR Auction to offer The Ronnie Paloger JFK Memorabilia + Photograph Collection

Leading London silver dealer Koopman Rare Art exhibits for the first time at the Winter Show

Gray appoints Sharon Kim as Partner in New York

This festival could alter your sense of film history

Sean Kelly is now representing Su Xiaobai

Artcurial to stage its prestigious winter sales at the legendary Hôtel Hermitage in Monaco

Jerwood Arts exhibits works by Silvia Rosi and Theo Simpson

Finalists announced for Manchester Open Awards

Exhibition features three artists across multiple disciplines

Katie Paterson's First There is a Mountain is composted at National Trust property

Exhibition brings together works by four artists residing in Belgium

Parrasch Heijnen opens an exhibition of works by Peter Alexander

Artwork that inspired the UK's obsession with the riddle of the golden hare sells for 20 times estimate

Perrotin Paris opens an exhibition of new works by New York-based artist Daniel Arsham

Steve McQueen criticises BAFTA for lack of diversity

Phillips appoints Paul Redmayne as Head of Private Sales, Jewellery

How To Find Seattles Best Videographer and Editor

The 5 Best Cameras for Wildlife Photographers - 2020/2021 Guide




Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 



Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
(1941 - 2019)
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful