The First Art Newspaper on the Net   Established in 1996 United States Monday, November 20, 2017


Archaeological find uncovers royal palace where Henry VIII and Elizabeth I were born
Greenwich Palace had a scale and magnificence comparable to Hampton Court Palace, in an idyllic riverside setting. Photo: Old Royal Naval College.


LONDON.- The team working on the major development of the Painted Hall in Greenwich have uncovered the remains of Greenwich Palace, notable as the birthplace of Henry VIII and of his daughters Mary and Elizabeth I.

Greenwich Palace had a scale and magnificence comparable to Hampton Court Palace, in an idyllic riverside setting. It comprised everything from state apartments, courtyards, a chapel, elegant gardens, a substantial tiltyard for jousting with a five-storey tower for viewing, and was at the very heart of Tudor cultural life and intrigue.

Careful preparation of the ground for the new visitor centre below the Painted Hall led to the discovery of two rooms of the Tudor palace, including a floor featuring lead-glazed tiles. Being set back from the river, these are likely to be from the service range, possibly where the kitchens, bakehouse, brewhouse and laundry were. One of the rooms was clearly subterranean and contains a series of unusual niches, which archaeologists believe may be ‘bee boles’ for the keeping of skeps (hive baskets) during the winter months when the bee colonies are hibernating. Bee boles have occasionally been found in historic garden walls, but it is very rare to find them internally, making this find even more significant. The niches were probably used for keeping food and drink cool in the summer months when the skeps were outside.

Nothing of Greenwich Palace survives above ground; with the coming of the Stuart dynasty, and the construction of the Queens House, the old-fashioned Tudor Palace was neglected in favour of the new renaissance style, and with the designs for a new Stuart palace, the Tudor buildings were swept away. In fact the new palace, which was being designed by Christopher Wren to be a little like the phenomenum that was Versailles, was never built, and instead, Greenwich Hospital was created instead, which today is the Old Royal Naval College.

Discussions are now underway over the possibility of displaying the Tudor archaeology in situ within what will be the new Painted Hall interpretation gallery.

Duncan Wilson, Chief Executive of Historic England said: “This is a really remarkable find. The Tudor period is one which grips the public imagination like no other, probably because of the larger-than-life characters like Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, as well as the magnificence of the buildings. To find a trace of Greenwich Palace, arguably the most important of all the Tudor palaces, is hugely exciting. The unusual and enigmatic nature of the structure has given us something to scratch our heads over and research, but it does seem to shine a light on a very poorly known function of the gardens and the royal bees. The most exciting aspect is that the Old Royal Naval College is able and willing to incorporate this into the new visitor centre, so everyone can see a small part of the palace, for the first time in hundreds of years.”

Greenwich Palace was built by Henry V’s brother, Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, in 1426, and rebuilt by Henry VII between c1500-06. The Palace was substantially demolished at the end of the seventeenth century to make way for the Royal Naval College built by Sir Christopher Wren and Nicholas Hawksmoor between 1692-1728. From surviving paintings and documents it is known that the palace covered much of the land on which the Old Royal Naval College stands.

The Painted Hall at the Old Royal Naval College, described as ‘the Sistine Chapel of the UK’, is currently undergoing a major transformation over the next eighteen months, including the creation of a new visitor centre, Sackler Gallery and café developed by Hugh Broughton Architects. Visitors currently have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get up close to the ceiling of the Painted Hall through a series of ceiling tours, which are accessible to all.

A major gift of £1m from The Gosling Foundation was announced in January 2017. Other grants, including £3.1m awarded from the Heritage Lottery Fund in March 2016 and support from some of the UK’s leading philanthropists, have enabled the £8.5m conservation project to begin. A further £2m is necessary to complete the project, and all donations will go towards the conservation fund and the conservation.






Today's News

August 20, 2017

Archaeological find uncovers royal palace where Henry VIII and Elizabeth I were born

Bones, silver found in 18th-century Dutch wreck off UK

Sotheby's Made in Britain to showcase 'A Century of Ceramics'

Christie's announces Asian Art Week: A series of auctions, viewings, and events

Sotheby's to offer the Yeats Family collection

Secrets of the deep: Senegal's slave shipwreck detective

Exhibition illustrates the various ways we express our love of flowers

Are Confederate monuments important works of art?

Dorotheum announces Part II sale of the collection of art dealer Reinhold Hofstätter

Designs of the Year nominees announced by Design Museum

Comparing the jaws of Porcupine fish reveals three new species

Exhibition presents Isamu Noguchi's influential designs for playgrounds and play structures

New Harry Potter book reveals values and fandom behind our favorite wizard

Embattled Trumps to skip top art awards

Timbuktu's mausoleums, ancient protectors of city

British TV star Bruce Forsyth dies aged 89

Multisite exhibition engages 16 U.S. Latino and Latin American artists and collectives

Dave Lefner Reduction Linocut exhibition on view at the Pasadena Museum of California Art

New Britain Museum of American Art displays monumental masterpiece by Samuel F.B. Morse

Graham Nash collection of underground art tops $6.3 million comics event at Heritage Auctions

Shaker Museum / Mount Lebanon hires Director of Advancement

New Orleans Museum of Art celebrates new hires

Larger than life portrait painting of Thomas Edison, signed by him, will be sold August 29th

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Grasshopper found embedded in van Gogh masterpiece at Nelson-Atkins

2.- Scientists discover a mysterious, plane-sized 'void' in Great Pyramid in Egypt

3.- The largest collection of Viking artifacts on display in North America comes to the Royal Ontario Museum

4.- Rafael Soriano opens at Frost Art Museum FIU: Kicks off Miami's Art Basel season

5.- Cleveland Museum of Art releases new strategic plan

6.- Exhibition tells the story of the artists who fled to Britain to escape war in France

7.- Zahi Hawass criticises pyramid void 'discovery'

8.- French court to rule on Nazi-looted Pissarro painting

9.- Clark Art Institute exhibition studies less-explored aspects of Impressionist works

10.- Exhibitions in Germany and Switzerland present works from the Gurlitt Estate



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher:Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez


Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful