The First Art Newspaper on the Net   Established in 1996 United States Tuesday, June 25, 2019


Scans point to hidden chamber possibly heralding discovery of Queen Nefertiti's mummy
A picture taken on November 28, 2015 shows the sarcophagus of King Tutankhamun displayed in his burial chamber in the Valley of the Kings, close to Luxor, 500 kms south of the Egyptian capital, Cairo. Scans in King Tutankhamun's tomb in Egypt's Valley of the Kings point to a hidden chamber, the country's antiquities minister said Saturday, possibly heralding the discovery of Queen Nefertiti's resting place. AFP PHOTO / KHALED DESOUKI.

By: Tony Gamal-Gabriel


LUXOR (AFP).- Scans of King Tutankhamun's tomb in Egypt's Valley of the Kings point to a secret chamber, archaeologists said Saturday, possibly heralding the discovery of Queen Nefertiti's long-sought mummy.

Using hi-tech infrared and radar technology, researchers are trying to unravel the mystery over the legendary monarch's resting place.

A wife of Tutankhamun's father Akhenaten, Nefertiti played a major political and religious role in the 14th century BC, and the discovery of her tomb would be a major prize for Egyptologists.

Experts are now "approximately 90 percent" sure there is a hidden chamber in Tutankhamun's tomb, Antiquities Minister Mamduh al-Damati told a news conference.

The scans were spurred by a study by renowned British archaeologist Nicholas Reeves that said Nefertiti's lost tomb may be hidden in an adjoining chamber.

Speaking at the same press conference, Reeves said the initial results could bear out his theory.

"Clearly it does look from the radar evidence as if the tomb continues, as I have predicted," he said.

"The radar, behind the north wall (of Tutankhamun's burial chamber) seems pretty clear. If I am right it is a continuation -- corridor continuation -- of the tomb, which will end in another burial chamber," he said.

"It does look indeed as if the tomb of Tutankhamun is a corridor tomb... and it continues beyond the decorated burial chamber," he added.

"I think it is Nefertiti and all the evidence points in that direction."

Cult of sun god
Damati emphasised that the findings were "preliminary" results, and a Japanese expert working with the archaeologists needed a month to analyse the scans.

Experts carried out a preliminary scan of the tomb earlier this month using infra-red thermography to map out the temperature of its walls.

Damati said at that time that the analysis showed "differences in the temperatures registered on different parts of the northern wall" of the tomb.

But the minister and Reeves had differed on whose mummy they expected to find.

According to Reeves, professor of archaeology at the University of Arizona, Tutankhamun, who died unexpectedly, was buried hurriedly in an underground chamber probably not intended for him.

The boy king died aged 19 in 1324 BC after just nine years on the throne. His final resting place was discovered by another British Egyptologist, Howard Carter, in 1922.

Reeves's theory is that priests would have been forced to reopen Nefertiti's tomb 10 years after her death because the young pharaoh's own mausoleum had not yet been built.

But Damati believes that such a chamber, if found adjoining Tutankhamun's tomb, may contain Kiya, another of Akhenaten's wives.

Akhenaten is known for having temporarily converted ancient Egypt to monotheism by imposing the cult of sun god Aton.

Nefertiti's role in the cult would have ruled out her burial in the Valley of the Kings according to Zahi Hawass, the country's former antiquities minister and expert on ancient Egypt.

"Nefertiti will never be buried in the Valley of the Kings," he told AFP.

"The lady was worshipping Aton with Akhenaten for years. The priests would never allow her to be buried in the Valley of the Kings," he said.

Hawass also questioned how archaeologists would enter the hidden part of the tomb without causing damage.

Damati said that after the analysis, that would be the next challenge.

"The data is being analysed to get a clear picture of what's behind the wall," he said.

"The next step, which we will announce once we agree on it, will be accessing what's behind the wall without damaging the tomb," he said.



© 1994-2015 Agence France-Presse





Today's News

November 30, 2015

Scans point to hidden chamber possibly heralding discovery of Queen Nefertiti's mummy

Etchings by Peter Schuyff & Edda Renouf on view at Anders Wahlstedt Fine Art

The unsettling art of contemporary Cuban artist Carlos Luna, or the naughty boy's tricks

Forger claims Da Vinci masterpiece "La Bella Principessa" is supermarket checkout girl

Stedelijk Museum opens Isa Genzken's first major retrospective in the Netherlands

Calder stabiles among Post War and Contemporary Art highlights at Leslie Hindman

British artist Anish Kapoor exhibits three painted reliefs created at the Rijksmuseum

Sotheby's New York to offer an extraordinary collection of 18th- & 19th-century paintings

Eli Wilner & Company loaned 18 frames to Christie's Auction House for their American Paintings Auction

Exhibition of early paintings by Dutch painter Piet Mondrian opens at David Zwirner

Exhibition explores how animals considered exotic by the Georgians and early Victorians were depicted

Sotheby's Contemporary Art Auction offers works by César, Dubuffet, Riopelle, Zao Wou-Ki, Soulages

Antiquities Coalition initiative supports Egypt's museums in securing priceless patrimony

Franco-Swiss artist Valérie Favre's first exhibition in France since 2009 opens in Strasbourg

Exhibition of new paintings by Puerto Rican artist Angel Otero on view at Lehmann Maupin

Ennesima: An exhibition of seven exhibitions on Italian art opens at Triennale di Milano

Nominees announced for The Vincent Award 2016

Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki reveals new directions in contemporary New Zealand painting

Exhibition of works by Sebastian Lloyd Rees on view at mother's tankstation

Major survey of artist Nari Ward open at Pérez Art Museum Miami

Profiles in History to offer the largest selection of master fantasy artist Frank Frazetta's drawings

December sale spans Le Brun attributed "Red Sea" to rouge Hermès to rare Tiffany

Bloomberg New Contemporaries opens at ICA, London

Galerie Perrotin opens second exhibition dedicated to the late Korean artist Chung Chang-Sup

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Art of early man found in the greatest meteor crater on earth

2.- Exhibition celebrates Helmut Newton's 50-year career through a rare and unseen collection of vintage prints

3.- World's most costly painting on Saudi prince's yacht: report

4.- Sotheby's celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing with an auction

5.- Domaine de Chantilly exhibits Leonardo da Vinci's 'Nude Mona Lisa'

6.- New book offers front-row seat to greatest concert in history

7.- The New York Botanical Garden opens its largest botanical exhibition ever

8.- The most famous car in the world: RM Sotheby's presents James Bond Aston Martin DB5

9.- Mexico unearths what may be historic recording of Frida Kahlo

10.- Exhibition of Pierre-Auguste Renoir's paintings marks centenary of his death



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher:Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez


Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful