The First Art Newspaper on the Net Established in 1996 United States Monday, November 24, 2014


Ashmolean's summer exhibition displays objects from ancient Egypt’s Amarna Period
Cartier diamond brooch Length: 4 cm, about 1923 Private Collection
OXFORD.- Lord Carnarvon and Howard Carter’s excavation of the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922 was one of the most significant archaeological discoveries of the 20th century. The name of the ‘boy king’ is now synonymous with the glories of ancient Egypt and the spectacular contents of his tomb continue to enthral the public and scholars alike. The Ashmolean’s summer exhibition displays objects from ancient Egypt’s Amarna Period (about 1350–1330 BC) with material from the archives of Oxford’s Griffith Institute, celebrating its 75th year in 2014, to tell the story of the discovery of the tomb, its popular appeal, and to explore how modern Egyptologists continue to interpret the evidence.

Howard Carter (1874–1939) came to Egyptology through his skills as a draughtsman and artist, commissioned to copy hieroglyphic inscriptions and tomb paintings at the age of seventeen. By 1907 Carter had become an experienced archaeologist and was employed by George Herbert, the fifth Earl of Carnarvon (1866–1923), to lead his excavations of ancient tombs on the Theban west bank (opposite modern Luxor). In 1914 the opportunity to dig in the Valley of the Kings presented itself and both men jumped at the chance to search for one of the last royal tombs to be located, that of Tutankhamun.

Little was known about Tutankhamun when Carter and Carnarvon began their search. He appeared to have been a king of minor historical importance but ruled at a time when Egypt’s empire was at the height of its power and wealth, reaching from Sudan to Syria. Years of fruitless excavation followed and by 1922 Lord Carnarvon could no longer afford the costs and decided to terminate the work. Carter persuaded him to undertake one more season and within days of the renewed digging Carter wrote in his diary, on 5 November: “Discovered tomb under tomb of Ramses VI / Investigated same & found seals intact.”

The discovery caused a sensation. The Times of London was given exclusive access to the excavation and soon photographs of the tomb and its spectacular contents taken by the excavation’s photographer, Harry Burton, appeared around the world. Reporting on the story in February 1923, a New York Times correspondent wrote: “There is only one topic of conversation…One cannot escape the name of Tut-Ankh-Amen anywhere. It is shouted in the streets, whispered in the hotels, while the local shops advertise Tut-Ankh-Amen art, Tut-Ankh-Amen hats, Tut-Ankh-Amen curios, Tut-Ankh-Amen photographs. There is a Tut-Ankh-Amen dance tonight at which the piece is to be a Tut-Ankh-Amen rag.”

The public was in the grips of what became known as ‘Tutmania’. Throughout the 1920s, Egypt and its boy-king were celebrated in film, advertising, popular music, fashion, and design.

Discovering Tutankhamun brings together objects, photographs, and archive material from leading collections to tell the story of the search for the tomb, the painstaking recording of its contents, and the research that continues to illuminate Tutankhamun and his world. On display are Harry Burton’s iconic photographs, Carter’s hand-written diaries, and the sketches and records made in the tomb as it was cleared from 1922–32. Much of this material from the Tutankhamun archive in the University of Oxford’s Griffith Institute, has never before been exhibited in public. Other highlights include some of the finest art from the Amarna Period on loan from major international museums and from the Ashmolean’s own superb collections. Objects which illustrate the frenzied enthusiasm for ancient Egyptian art and culture, including 1920s jewellery and fashion, decorative arts, and vintage posters and advertisements, explore the 1920s ‘Tutmania’ and the fascination with Tutankhamun which endures today.

Professor Christopher Brown CBE, Director of the Ashmolean, says: “Discovering Tutankhamun tells a thrilling story of archaeological discovery and explores its impact on both scholarship and popular culture. The exhibition shows archival material which has never been seen in public before, with major loans from around the world, and provides the opportunity to re-examine pivotal moments in both ancient and modern history.”





Today's News

August 4, 2014

Argentinian scientists discover 55 million year old mammal fossils in Antarctica

The shrinking evolution that turned T. Rex to Tweety: study by professor at the University of Adelaide

Did lower testosterone help the development of cooperation, complex communication and modern culture?

Ashmolean's summer exhibition displays objects from ancient Egypt’s Amarna Period

Hollywood a-listers get top billing at Heritage Auctions' Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signature Auction

Retrospective examination of the entire oeuvre of photographer Walker Evans on view at Martin Gropius Bau

'Marsden Hartley: The German Paintings 1913-1915' opens at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Tower of London marks centenary of the First World War with installation by Paul Cummins and Tom Piper

Lund Humphries publishes comprehensive survey of C.R.W. Nevinson's printmaking career

American and European circus is the focus of RISD Museum's summer exhibition

'Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary': Art Institute of Chicago unthinks exhibition marketing

'The Committed Picture: The Photography Department in Context' opens at MKG Hamburg

Once Mexico's booze of 'drunks,' mezcal earns respect and is now seen as a boutique drink

Guelaguetza festival keeps Mexican folklore alive

Young Russian soloist Alena Baeva to play 1697 Stradivari violin

Jihadists defend Iraq shrine demolitions

Photography and Chinese ink painting meld in contemporary exhibition

Dior dresses up the Palace of Versailles

'Second Sight: The David Kronn Collection' opens at the Irish Museum of Modern Art

Salvadoran president's home becomes gallery with focus on poor

Superheroes soar into the Hamptons

Summer group exhibition opens at Merry Karnowsky Gallery

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Greece holds breath as skeleton found in Alexander the Great-era tomb at Amphipolis

2.- Spain mourns the death of art collector Cayetana Fitz-James Stuart, Duchess of Alba

3.- Meet the ancestors: Exhibition at Bordeaux gallery reveals faces of prehistoric humans

4.- Getty Foundation and partners launch free of charge online art collection catalogues

5.- Historic photos of dead Cuban revolutionary Che Guevara resurface in small Spanish town

6.- Exhibition showcases the first two 'Poesie' created by Titian following their restoration

7.- O'Keeffe painting sells for more than three times the previous world auction record for any female artist

8.- Crystal Bridges announces the departure of museum President Don Bacigalupi

9.- artnet Auctions offers a later example of Yayoi Kusama's important Infinity-Nets series

10.- 'Degenerate art' should go back to museums: German advisor Jutta Limbach



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez - Marketing: Carla Gutiérrez
Special Contributor: Liz Gangemi - Special Advisor: Carlos Amador
Contributing Editor: Carolina Farias

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org theavemaria.org juncodelavega.org facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site