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Face in the Crowds: Lehmann Maupin opens exhibitions of Alex Prager's new body of work
Alex Prager, Crowd #3 (Pelican Beach), 2013. Archival pigment print, 59.5 x 92 inches, 151.1 x 233.7 cm. 60.5 x 93.56 x 2.25 inches (framed), 153.7 x 237.6 x 5.7 cm. Edition of 6. Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong.


NEW YORK, NY.- Lehmann Maupin announces an exhibition of artist Alex Prager’s new body of work, Face in the Crowd, on view at both of the gallery’s New York locations from January 9 – February 22, 2014. This two-part exhibition features large-scale photographs of elaborately staged crowd scenes at 201 Chrystie Street and an immersive three-channel video installation at 540 West 26th Street. The exhibition is Prager’s debut show with Lehmann Maupin since joining the gallery in September 2013. Concurrently on view through March 9, 2014 is the artist’s largest exhibition in a United States museum at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Shot on a Los Angeles soundstage in early 2013, Face in the Crowd is Prager’s most complex and ambitious work to date. The artist directed hundreds of actors on constructed sets to create portraits of large crowds at airport terminals, lobbies, beaches, movie theaters and other public spaces. For each scene, Prager taps into a shared cultural memory to create images that are familiar yet strange. The characters, clothing, hairstyles and poses are all carefully chosen by the artist to convey a range of time periods from mid-century to the present and recall cultural references drawn from street photography and classic Hollywood cinema. The ambiguity of the eras and locations suggest a sense of timelessness while also creating a world that synthesizes fiction and reality. The viewer is removed from the scenes at seemingly impossible vantage points and peer over the crowd of individual characters, each connected by their close proximity, yet simultaneously isolated in their own private worlds. The countless facial expressions are directed toward no person in particular and suggest private thoughts and solitary emotions. In an age of increased communication through technology, where in some ways we are more connected than ever, Prager’s scenes of disconnected characters within the crowd remind us of the resulting decline of interpersonal contact in our media saturated society.

Prager further explores the complicated and at times contradictory emotions associated with crowds through a new film starring actress Elizabeth Banks. An immersive experience that puts the viewer directly in the center of a three-channel video installation, the film opens with a series of confessional monologues in which characters from the crowd scenes poignantly relate their own stories and insights, such as childhood memories, recurring nightmares and personal revelations. Suddenly, the scene changes and an orchestra strikes as a sea of people flood into view. The iconic heroine then leads the viewer on a journey through the crowd wordlessly expressing a range of emotions including isolation, sadness, confusion, curiosity and anxiety. The juxtaposition of character monologues and the frenetic crowd scene poignantly illustrates that within a swirling sea of strangers, there are countless individual stories and unique experiences unfolding. Whereas Prager’s large-scale photographs of crowd scenes expose the disconnection between individuals in society, her new film Face in the Crowd explores the unspoken connections among individuals and is a reminder that we are part of something larger than oneself.

Alex Prager was born in 1979 in Los Angeles, California, where she continues to live and work. A self-taught artist, she was inspired to take up photography after seeing the color images of William Eggleston, who is widely regarded as the father of contemporary color photography. Her work has been exhibited internationally, most prominently in Alex Prager: Face in the Crowd at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. (2013), Alex Prager: Compulsion (2012) at FOAM in Amsterdam, and New Photography 2010 at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. Prager has been recognized with the FOAM Paul Huf Award (2012), among other honors. Her editorial work has been featured in Vogue and W, and her film series “Touch of Evil,” commissioned by The New York Times Magazine, won a 2012 Emmy Award. Prager’s work is represented in the collections of major museums including New York’s Museum of Modern Art and Whitney Museum of American Art, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and Moderna Museet in Stockholm, Sweden.





Today's News

January 10, 2014

Philadelphia Museum of Art acquires the Keith L. and Katherine Sachs Collection of Art

Christie's New York announces the return of the Renaissance Sale on January 29

New from Steidl: "The Unknown Berenice Abbott" edited by Ron Kurtz and Hank O'Neal

A rare self-portrait of Artemisia Gentileschi leads Christie's Old Master Paintings Sale Part I

"The Image Gallery Redux: 1959-1962" opens at Howard Greenberg Gallery in New York

Two major bodies of works by artist Emil Lukas on view at Sperone Westwater

Hong Kong's first major international auction of Chinese stamps in 2014 expected to bring over HK$60 million

Sensational Pointers lead the way at Bonhams dogs in Show & Field Sale set for February 12

A Chromatic Loss: Group exhibition curated by Jeffrey Uslip opens at Bortolami

Face in the Crowds: Lehmann Maupin opens exhibitions of Alex Prager's new body of work

David Zwirner debuts a new film by Stan Douglas featuring a band of professional musicians

Exhibition at Edwynn Houk Gallery highlights a cross-section of Danny Lyon's celebrated career

Rarely-seen Jane Morris portrait now on display at the De Morgan Centre in London

New US State Department award for work in Ayutthaya, Thailand

Sotheby's appoints Sharon Chan as Head of Watches Asia

A series of visceral photographic studies of animal remains by Alex Van Gelder on view at Hauser and Wirth

Jason Stopa's first solo show in Manhattan opens at Novella

MIA in MIA: Lyons Wier Gallery opens group exhibition

"Edwin Ruda: The Band Paintings (1969 - 1972)" opens at Berry Campbell

"The Space Beyond" curated by Katharina Bosse opens at The Camera Club of New York

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