The First Art Newspaper on the Net   Established in 1996 United States Friday, September 30, 2016


China's Ai Weiwei will fight tax charges "to the death"
Dissident Chinese artist Ai Weiwei speaks to members of the media in the doorway of his studio after he was released on bail in Beijing in this June 23, 2011 file photo. China on October 13, 2011 criticised a U.K.-based contemporary art magazine for naming dissident artist Ai Weiwei as the art world's most powerful figure, saying the selection based on "political bias" runs contrary to the magazine's principles. Ai, whose 81-day detention earlier this year caused an international outcry, topped ArtReview's 10th annual "Power 100" list. REUTERS/David Gray.

By: Sui-Lee Wee

BEIJING (REUTERS).- Dissident Chinese artist Ai Weiwei vowed Wednesday to fight tax evasion charges "to the death," a day after the government ordered a company linked to him to pay 15 million yuan ($2.4 million) in back taxes and fines.

The 54-year-old artist, who has been a thorn in the government's side for his satirical art and criticism of contemporary China, was detained without charge for 81 days this year in a move that drew criticism from Western governments.

He was released in late June on condition that he not talk to foreign media, since when he has mainly kept to himself and has been reluctant to accept interviews.

But in a two-hour interview with Reuters, Ai, who had a hand in designing the Bird's Nest stadium for the 2008 Beijing Olympics, showed flashes of his previously fiery self.

"Will a person like Ai Weiwei surrender?" In my dictionary, there's no such word 'surrender'," the bearded artist said at his home and studio in northeastern Beijing where a team of lawyers and tax experts and his wife, Lu Qing, were gathered.

"Ordinary people will not be able to endure this. But because they've targeted me, I'm still willing to accompany them on this road. Because I'm not afraid of them. I think it's improper that a country is engaging in shameless activities."

Ai said authorities had not shown him evidence of the alleged tax evasion and had told the manager and accountant of Beijing Fake Cultural Development Ltd., which has helped produce Ai's internationally renowned art and designs, not to meet him.

According to Ai, the Public Security Bureau has labeled him the "controlling person" of the company, although his wife is the legal representative. Ai said that if he didn't pay the penalty, his wife could go to jail.

"And for a country like that, I will fight them to the death," he said.

"I WIN MORALLY'

Ai said he did not have the money to pay the back taxes and fines within the time limit of 15 days. He has decided to use his 79-year-old mother Gao Ying's house as collateral before asking for an administrative review, in which a panel re-examines the merits of an official decision.

"These few months, what I've seen on the Internet has infuriated me," Gao said in her courtyard home in inner Beijing, which she believes is worth around 25 million yuan. "It's unacceptable that a government can bully its citizens."

The lawyer for Beijing Fake Cultural Development Ltd, Pu Zhiqiang, said he planned to ask authorities in the tax bureau to revoke the case, saying it was "illegal."

Ai, who has spoken out on issues ranging from last year's award of the Nobel Peace Prize to dissident Liu Xiaobo to Internet curbs, said authorities had targeted him for publishing a scathing attack on the government in an August commentary in Newsweek, in which he said citizens' rights were being violated.

Ai has taken his fight to the Internet with more than 100,000 followers on Twitter and warns the government case could backfire.

"There's a trial on the Internet every day," he said, with the government as "the accused."

"I think I win morally. I'm very lucky to have this kind of position. The normal act that I've taken -- just to ask the truth -- has become very heroic in this nation."

(Editing by Ken Wills and Nick Macfie)






Today's News

November 4, 2011

Tate Liverpool exhibition explores how stories have influenced the visual arts

Historic conservation project by Global Heritage Fund begins at "Machu Picchu of the North"

Exhibition of the private collection of Robert Rauschenberg at Gagosian Gallery in New York

Police recover 2 stolen paintings by Dutch masters and return them to Hofje van Mevrouw van Aerden museum

Sotheby's New York announces sale of important works in its Latin American auction

Bonhams to sell Imperial Chinese jar recalling Emperor with 99 sons who adopted one more to make 100

Picasso, de Chirico, Léger, and Picabia in the presence of the antique at Getty Villa

Exhibition of nine new, large-scale watercolor paintings by Walton Ford at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Rare 1938 Gibson Advance Jumbo guitar brings $53,775 to lead $1.43 million Heritage Vintage Guitar auction

Software developers Contrasto launch app series for iPhone and iPad on great photographers

Psychology, biology and religion collide at the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art

Library of Congress acquires collection of rare architectural drawings, and photographs

National Gallery of Victoria launches contemporary art space with an exhibition of work by Ranjani Shettar

Tel Aviv Museum of Art inaugurates new building with a major exhibition of works by Anselm Kiefer

George Hendrik Breitner: Pioneer of Street Photography at the Paris Photo Fair

China's Ai Weiwei will fight tax charges "to the death"

Installations made entirely of sugar and salt in Ken + Julia's first UK solo show at GV Art

"Working Together" exhibition by Claire Fontaine at Metro Pictures

100-year-old artist donates works to Goddard

20//20 collective curates exhibition at Bethnal Green Working Men's Club in London

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Stone Age mummy Oetzi still revealing secrets, 25 years on

2.- Tunisian remains found by British researchers prove 100,000-year human presence

3.- Rembrandt's four earliest paintings reunited for the first time at the Ashmolean

4.- Baltimore Museum of Art is one of only two major U.S. museums to feature an installation by transgender artists

5.- Archaeologists find 2,000-year-old human skeleton at Mediterranean shipwreck

6.- Digitally unwrapped scroll reveals earliest Old Testament scripture

7.- Rich London residents angry over Tate Modern voyeurs

8.- V&A Museum chief quits to fight nationalism post-Brexit

9.- Exhibition in Turin celebrates the most important family of Flemish artists

10.- Pointillism is now the focus of a high-calibre exhibition at the Albertina in Vienna



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher:Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful