The First Art Newspaper on the Net   Established in 1996 United States Friday, November 22, 2019


Egypt unveils trove of ancient coffins excavated in Luxor
Egypt's Antiquities Minister Khaled el-Enany (R), and Mostafa Waziri (L), the Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, surround a sarcophagus belonging to a man in front the Hatshepsut Temple at the Valley of the Kings in Luxor on October 19, 2019. Egypt revealed today a rare trove of 30 ancient wooden coffins that have been well-preserved over millennia in the archaeologically rich Valley of the Kings in Luxor. The antiquities ministry officially unveiled the discovery made at Asasif, a necropolis on the west bank of the Nile River, at a press conference against the backdrop of the Hatshepsut Temple. Khaled DESOUKI / AFP.

by Farid Farid


LUXOR (AFP).- Egypt revealed Saturday a rare trove of 30 ancient wooden coffins that have been well-preserved over millennia in the archaeologically rich Valley of the Kings in Luxor.

The antiquities ministry officially unveiled the discovery made at Asasif, a necropolis on the west bank of the Nile River, at a press conference against the backdrop of the Hatshepsut Temple.

"This is the first discovery in Asasif by dedicated Egyptian hands, comprised of archaeologists, conservationists and workers," the head of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, Mostafa al-Waziri, told reporters.

The 30 ornately decorated coffins of men, women and children were found only a metre (three feet) underground, stacked in two rows. They are believed to belong to family members of high priests.

Waziri explained that excavations of the site in the 19th century had revealed royal tombs, but this latest discovery had yielded a collection of priests' burials.

The sarcophagi date back to the 22nd Dynasty, founded around 3,000 years ago in the 10th century BC.

Despite their age, black, green, red and yellow paintings of snakes, birds, lotus flowers and hieroglyphics that cover the coffins are still clearly visible.

A sealed coffin belonging to a young ancient Egyptian child was incomplete and unpainted.

"We only did remedial first-aid on these well-preserved coffins. They are considered to be in great condition because there were hardly any settlements" around the site, local antiquities ministry restorer Saleh Abdel-Gelil told AFP.

Tombs and tourism
Discoveries of ancient Egyptian relics had slowed after the 2011 Arab Spring revolution that toppled long-time autocrat Hosni Mubarak and plunged the country in political turmoil, according to Antiquities Minister Khaled el-Enany.

Several high-level officials, including President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, have in recent weeks affirmed Egypt's stability following rare, small-scale protests in September that drew a heavy-handed response from security forces.

"Now in Egypt we have more security so we have more foreign nationals. We have more than 250 (archaeological) missions. More work equals more discoveries", he told AFP on the sidelines of the press conference.

At Marsam, a boutique hotel in Luxor, the flurry of archaeological discoveries in recent years has translated into good business and foot traffic.

"You can say two years ago we noticed a difference. There was less than half the people that we have today," said Birte Fuchs, a German who manages the Marsam with her husband and local partners. "Tourism is coming back".

This year, over 11 million visitors travelled to Egypt, following a sharp dip in numbers after the revolution.

Egypt has sought to promote its archaeological heritage and finds in a bid to revive its vital tourism sector, which has suffered due to political insecurity and terror attacks.

However, critics point to archaeological sites and museums suffering from negligence and poor management.

But Enany, the minister, remains upbeat.

"Some people, we don't have to mention names, don't want us to have these discoveries... that impress the world," said Enany before throngs of tourists, referring to detractors.

"These discoveries are priceless for Egypt's reputation," he added.

Sporting his trademark cowboy hat, Egyptologist Zahi Hawass, who has consistently promoted his discoveries to a global audience, was also at Saturday's unveiling.

He took selfies with tourists who flocked to the coffins.


© Agence France-Presse






Today's News

October 20, 2019

Egypt unveils trove of ancient coffins excavated in Luxor

Elizabeth Taylor's personal treasures set for auction block

Keith Haring mural cut out of New York stairwell heads to auction

Ed Clark, pioneering Abstract Expressionist painter, dies at 93

A passion for drawing: The Albertina Museum exhibits drawings from the Guerlain Collection

The Phillips Collection features projections and sculptural portraits by the Los Carpinteros collective

Christie's announces highlights included in its Fine Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art auction in London

Marc-Arthur Kohn to sell the interior of a castle whose decor was designed in the 1950-60s by Erté

Phillips to offer Norman Rockwell's 'Before the Shot' on 14 November

US-French comic book tackles mass shootings with superheroes

National Gallery of Australia launches new learning gallery and studio

Two solo exhibitions of new work by Vik Muniz on view at Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

Art Deco & Beyond: A celebration of 20th century jewellery at Sotheby's Geneva this November

A Louis XV silver tureen to lead Sotheby's October Auctions of Furniture & Decorative Arts in New York

Exhibition celebrates twenty-fifth anniversary of Fundación Botín's Visual Arts Grants

'Anila Quayyum Agha: Between Light and Shadow' transforms Toledo Museum of Art galleries

$4 U.S. coin worth $200,000 to be auctioned

Beaverbrook Art Gallery highlights contemporary Atlantic art in exhibition

Perrotin opens an exhibition of works by Takashi Murakami

Exhibition examines successive generations of African American artists

Dallas Museum of Art premieres new works by Wanda Koop and Sandra Cinto

Nobel Committee member defends Handke pick

Uruguay's national ballet stretches to new artistic heights

Ballet Philippines battles Disney, typhoons and poverty to endure

5 Must-have Devices for Hardcore Gamers




Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 



Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
(1941 - 2019)
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful