The First Art Newspaper on the Net   Established in 1996 United States Tuesday, July 23, 2019


William Turner Gallery presents an overview of Ed Moses's last period
Ed Moses, Woosh #1, 2016. Acrylic on canvas, 78" x 66". Image Courtesy of William Turner Gallery.


SANTA MONICA, CA.- Through the Looking Glass presents an overview of this last period, with a selection of work Moses produced over the last five years of his life. The work is ambitious and adventurous, and is marked by the artist’s spontaneity and expansive visual vocabulary.

The exhibition reveals an artist fully engaged, working in the moment, embracing a career’s worth of stylistic approaches, while incorporating new ones, as Moses boldly entered the labyrinths of the creative process. The works are dramatic in scope and exemplify the breadth of his reach. The title of the exhibition is from Lewis Carroll, one of Moses’s favorite writers, and refers to one of the artist’s fundamental beliefs - that art, at its best, is a portal to the unknown, through which one is transported to magical realms.

Moses did not paint to express; he painted to discover. Restless curiosity was his driving force - chance and circumstance his guiding principles. Often Moses would see the ghost images that appeared on the backs of his paintings as the very point and pith of the effort - subconscious postern doors opening to new dimensions through a willingness to embrace the unexpected.

It has been a year since Ed Moses has passed to the other side of the looking glass. We are honored to present these late works by this incredibly gifted, committed, and important painter.

Moses obsessively mined the possibilities of abstract painting for over 60 years, leaving an indelible mark on the contemporary art world. He was extraordinarily productive, and as he entered his 90s, he showed little signs of slowing down, painting daily, as he had done for decades, outdoors at his Venice studio, and attending numerous exhibitions of his work at various venues throughout the city.

Moses received national and international recognition for his singular, categorically evasive practice. Known for his restless intensity and ever-evolving style, Moses was considered one of LA’s most innovative painters, and a central figure in the city’s art scene since first gracing the walls of its legendary Ferus Gallery in 1958. Moses often referred to himself as a “mutator," driven less by the desire for self-expression than by a voracious appetite for experimentation and discovery. Describing his approach, Moses said, “The rational mind constantly wants to be in charge. The other parts want to fly. My painting is the encounter between the mind’s necessity for control and its yearning to fly, to be free from our ever-confining skull.”

Ed Moses was born on April 9, 1926, in Long Beach, CA. and did not initially choose the artistic path. After serving as a surgical technician during World War II, Moses intended to become a doctor. He enrolled in Long Beach City College’s pre-med program, but dropped out, citing his inability to memorize the curriculum. On a whim, he took a life-changing class with artist Pedro Miller, who recognized the spark of untapped talent. Moses changed course and enrolled in UCLA’s MFA program. There he met artist Craig Kauffman who introduced him to the future Ferus Gallery owner Walter Hopps.

Moses had his first exhibition at Ferus Gallery in 1958 while still a graduate student at UCLA. It was at Ferus that Moses would become a member of the raucous group of artists known as the “Cool School”; a group that included Kauffman, Billy Al Bengston, Robert Irwin, Edward Kienholz, Ken Price, Ed Ruscha, Larry Bell, John Altoon and Wallace Berman - all of whom pushed the boundaries of Post War art and shaped the nascent LA art scene at a time when almost none existed. His decades-long friendships in the art world include Frank Gehry, Tony Berlant, Vija Celmins, Alexis Smith, Joe Goode, and James Hayward.

A Buddhist practitioner since 1978, Moses worked in the moment, embracing and responding to elements of chance and circumstance. Endlessly intrigued with the metaphysical power of painting, he created works that embraced temporality, process, and presence remarking that, “the point is not to be in control, but to be in tune.”

“My thought is that the artist functions in a tribal context, that he is the shaman. When the urban life came in, tribes no longer existed … but there was still a genetic core of shamans, broken loose and genetically floating around. And when they had this gene, they shook the rattles. The shamans were the interpreters of the unknown, they reacted to the unknown with symbols and objects and wall painting. And that’s where it all came from. That’s where I came from. But when you’re a young man you don’t know that.”

Moses preferred the simple descriptive “painter” or “mark maker” to that of “artist." Likewise, he eschewed being called “creative," as he sought to make paintings that were evidence of the journey, rather than preconceived manifestations of a “creative” process. He noted that his life and art were about “exploring the phenomenal world” and never adhered to any singular art movement or style. Rather, he continued to experiment, embracing transformation and change.

His first museum shows were in 1976 - a show of drawings, works from 1958-1970s at the Wight Gallery at UCLA, and a show of new abstract and cubist red paintings at LACMA curated by Stephanie Barron, which marked a transitional moment in his career. While drawing was prominent in his work in the 1960s and early 70s, by the mid-70s, Moses turned primarily to painting.

He was the subject of a major retrospective at MOCA Los Angeles in 1996, and in 2014 he showed at University of California Irvine where he had taught in the seventies. On the occasion of his 2015 drawing show at LACMA of works from the 1960s and 70s, organized by Leslie Jones, director Michael Govan commented, “Ed Moses has been central to the history of art making in Los Angeles for more than half a century.” That exhibition included more than 40 drawings promised to the museum by the artist.

Moses’ work is included in the collections of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, The Hammer Museum, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Museum of Modern Art in New York.





Today's News

January 26, 2019

Tate Modern opens the UK's first major Pierre Bonnard exhibition in 20 years

The grand dame of light Brigitte Kowanz opens new exhibition at Häusler Contemporary in Zurich

Tate announces opening of Hyundai Tate Research Centre: Transnational

'Recent Abstractions by Anne Marchand' opens at the Morris Museum of Art

Hauser & Wirth to represent artist Mika Rottenberg

$1 Million Declaration of Independence tops Sotheby's biggest Americana Week series since 2007

Newseum building, showcase for press, to be sold

Orlando Museum of Art introduces Louis Dewis: A Belgian Post-Impressionist

Optimisation of the exhibition rooms and service facilities on the ground floor of the Alte Pinakothek

William Turner Gallery presents an overview of Ed Moses's last period

Lazinc opens a solo exhibition of new works by contemporary Tunisian-French artist eL Seed

The Ackland Art Museum opens an exhibition of drawings by Santiago Ramón y Cajal

Iraq priest who saved Christian heritage ordained Mosul archbishop

Taj Mahal police brandish catapults to scare monkeys away

Perrotin opens the first solo exhibition in South Korea by the artist JR

Lyman Allyn Art Museum showcases abstract art by James B Murphy

The Long Beach Museum of Art presents Sandow Birk's Imaginary Monuments

Maija Luutonen's first exhibition in Switzerland opens at Kunsthaus Pasquart

Exhibition across two venues features solo and newly-commissioned collaborative works

Bonnefantenmuseum goes the extra mile with three new exhibitions

Art Village Gallery opens exhibition by celebrated Nigerian artist Uchay Joel Chima

VisionQuesT 4rosso opens exhibition of works by Carla Iacono

Forgotten Cumbrian craft comes alive at Museum of Lakeland Life

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Original 'Star Wars' creators lift lid on special effects challenges

2.- Lost '$170 million Caravaggio' snapped up before French auction

3.- Mansell's 'Red Five' on pole for Bonhams sale

4.- Impressionism's 'forgotten woman' shines in new Paris show

5.- Sotheby's to auction the best-surviving NASA videotape recordings of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing

6.- Exhibition explores Dutch and Spanish painting of the 16th and 17th centuries

7.- Cyprus discovers 'first undisturbed Roman shipwreck'

8.- Sotheby's unveils 'Treasures from Chatsworth' with Leonardo Da Vinci drawing, Lucian Freud portraits, and more

9.- Infamous botched art restoration in Spain gets makeover

10.- 1958 Gibson Flying V Korina played by Dave Davies to grab center stage in Heritage Auctions' sale



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher:Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez


Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful