The First Art Newspaper on the Net    Established in 1996 Wednesday, July 6, 2022


Immersive digital experience at National Gallery allows visitors to step into Jan Gossaert's 'Adoration'
Artist’s impression of Sensing the Unseen: Step into Gossaert’s ‘Adoration’’ Image by Vasilija Abramovic.



LONDON.- A new immersive digital experience inspired by Jan Gossaert's 16th-century masterpiece The Adoration of the Kings is on view at the National Gallery over the Christmas period.

'Sensing the Unseen: Step into Gossaert’s ‘Adoration’ shows one of the Gallery’s most popular pictures as never before and is designed to allow for digital immersion while maintaining social distancing.

As visitors view the painting, the voice of one of its depicted characters, King Balthasar, speaks to them before light and sound lead them into individual ‘pods’ to experience an interactive version of the painting.

In the pods, visitors encounter a large screen featuring a digital image of the painting which has been ‘sonified’ using ambient sound, poetic spoken word and music. Visitors can zoom into details of the painting in an aural and visual experience that places them in the world of the painting and helps them discover and navigate previously unseen elements. These include those that the artist playfully hid away as well as those which reveal the way he used individual brushstrokes and techniques such as blotted glazes to create such intricate detail.

One of the great works of the Northern Renaissance, everything about the construction, composition, content and detail of this painting is designed to focus the viewer on the tiny naked Christ Child in the middle of a desolate scene of ruins. A picture of birth, death and renewal, its exaggerated use of space and perspective gives the sense that the whole world is coming to view this scene; the series of contrasts suggests a moment of significant change in a decaying world (such as the richly dressed kings pictured with dogs at their feet scrapping around amongst weeds and broken stones.)

The experience begins with the African kings Balthasar’s voice speaking of this transformative moment in time. As the king standing to the left of Mary and the baby Jesus, and with his attendant behind him, Balthasar is the character who best represents the journey to this point of revelation, as he waits in suspense to see the baby Jesus. The importance of Balthasar is highlighted by the fact that Gossaert signed the painting in two places – on his hat and on the collar of his attendant.




The exhibition explores approaches to both sound and interactive design and has been developed by an interdisciplinary team of Gallery experts, artists, designers, technologists and creatives working closely with our audiences.

'Sensing the Unseen: Step into Gossaert’s ‘Adoration’' is the first of a series of Room 1 exhibitions to be supported by the Capricorn Foundation for the next three years in memory of the late Mr H J Hyams.

It is curated by Dr Susan Foister, the Gallery’s Deputy Director and Curator of Early Netherlandish and German Paintings.

Jan Gossaert (Jean Gossart), active 1508; died 1532, 'The Adoration of the Kings', 1510-15. Oil on oak, 179.8 × 163.2 cm

This large altarpiece is crammed with peasants, animals, angels and richly dressed kings and courtiers, come to worship the infant Christ, who sits on his mother’s lap in a palatial but ruined building.

Jean Gossart has signed the painting on the hat of Balthasar, the king on the left, and on the silver collar of his attendant. Technical analysis has revealed the skill, time and effort which the artist put into this picture. There is a considerable amount of underdrawing and a great many changes made at all stages, all apparently done by Gossart himself. There are virtuoso passages of detail, especially in the foreground: the hairs sprouting from Caspar’s cheek and the decoration of his hat; the fringes of Balthasar’s stole.

By 1600 this painting was perhaps in the abbey of St Adrian at Geraardsbergen (Graamont) in East Flanders. Gossart seems to have painted it for the church between about 1510 and 1515, probably for the funerary chapel of Daniel van Boechout, lord of Boelare near Geraardsbergen.










Today's News

December 15, 2020

Exhibition of works by Louise Bourgeois opens in Porto

White Cube opens an exhibition of works by Tracey Emin

Immersive digital experience at National Gallery allows visitors to step into Jan Gossaert's 'Adoration'

A new evolutionary clue

Beethoven's 250th birthday: His greatness is in the details

Christie's December Design Sales in New York total $12 million

Laumeier Sculpture Park announces conservation projects on three major works

Joint exhibitions explore sound cultures and today's telecommunication society

Rare Steve Jobs letter featured in Apple Auction

'The Dark Knight' and 'The Blues Brothers' join National Film Registry

Cartoon cat helps keep Tunisia's revolutionary flame alight

Once upon a time: Pakistan's fabled storytellers fade away

WhatsApp recordings throw lifeline to Sahel artists

Japan's symbol of year nods to no-lockdown virus strategy

Istanbul is locking down. But not if you're a tourist.

What country music asked of Charley Pride

Anthony Veasna So, author on the brink of stardom, dies at 28

'Six' tries to get back onstage. Again, and again, and again.

Ben Bova, science fiction editor and author, is dead at 88

Exhibition of works by Nicole Eisenman and Keith Boadwee opens at FLAG

Holabird Western Americana Collections announces 5-day holiday auction

Machu Picchu closes again, over local train dispute

Budapest International Foto Awards announces the winners of 2020

Does the keto diet really work? Keto weight loss

Can you sue for a brain injury from a lack of oxygen?

Tips on how to become successful on Twitter

Writing as a kind of art

Temp Agencies and Temporary Staffing Agencies

7 Ways To Avoid Online Stalking And Cyberbullying While Playing Games

Do Not Know What Car to Rent?




Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 



Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
(1941 - 2019)
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez

sa gaming free credit

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site Parroquia Natividad del Señor
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful