The First Art Newspaper on the Net    Established in 1996 Sunday, October 24, 2021


From tattoos to tokens at Tokyo's first crypto art show
This picture taken on June 22, 2021 shows Japanese tattoo artist Ichi Hatano drawing a "hannya" mask digital image, following an interview with AFP at his studio in Tokyo. Hatano has now gone digital due to the pandemic, selling his designs as non-fungible tokens (NFTs), virtual objects that have taken the art world by storm. Philip FONG / AFP.

by Etienne Balmer



TOKYO (AFP).- Tokyo tattoo artist Ichi Hatano's usual business has dwindled during the pandemic, but now he's keen to mine a new stream of income at Japan's first crypto art exhibition.

Hatano's ink featuring Japanese folk creatures was especially popular with foreign visitors until Japan closed its borders to tourists due to Covid-19. Hatano has now gone digital, selling his designs as non-fungible tokens (NFTs), virtual objects that have taken the art world by storm.

"It's great for artists to have a new market, it opens a lot of possibilities," said the 44-year-old, who has five digital artworks on sale at the show, which opened last weekend in Tokyo.

Using the same blockchain technology behind cryptocurrencies, NFTs transform anything from illustrations to memes into virtual collectors' items that cannot be duplicated.

They rocketed into the mainstream this year and are now traded at major auction houses, generating several hundred million dollars in transactions every month.

Despite swapping his familiar canvas of human skin for pixels, Hatano said the creative process is the same.

"This is the emergence of a new economy, a new way to value art," he told AFP, saying he hoped the technology would allow creators like him to reach a wider public.

His work is among 150 NFTs from several dozen artists on display at the "CrypTokyo" exhibition in the Japanese capital's trendy Harajuku district.

Screens on the walls show a rotating selection of the works, whose NFTs can be bought online with the Dai and Ethereum cryptocurrencies for amounts ranging from a few hundred dollars up to around $50,000. Hatano hopes to bag around $1,400-2,400 for each of his offerings.

Some of the most expensive works are by Maxim, frontman of the British electropunk group The Prodigy and a recent convert to NFT art.

'Part of everyday existence'

Any digital creation can be traded virtually as an NFT, allowing artists to monetise digital art by giving buyers bragging rights to unique ownership -- even if the work can be endlessly reproduced online.




Classic parts of internet culture from GIFs to home videos have been auctioned off for huge sums. In March, the American digital artist Beeple became one of the world's three most valuable living artists when an NFT of one of his works sold for $69.3 million.

But in Japan, there's still some way to go before crypto art becomes a mainstay, said Yasumasa Yonehara, 62, an artist exhibiting at the show.

"NFTs are known in Japan for the sale of tweets by famous people for astronomical sums, and few know what it's really about," he said.

An authenticated version of Twitter founder Jack Dorsey's first tweet -- the first ever on the social network -- was sold in March for $2.9 million.

Japanese buyers are still approaching the format with caution, agreed the exhibition's 27-year-old curator Sascha Bailey.

"The problem a lot of people have with NFT art is 'how do I live with it, how do I interact with it in my everyday life?'" Bailey, who runs the international sales platform Blockchain Art Exchange, told AFP.

"What we're attempting to do here, at least in the proto-stages, is to show how this can be part of your everyday existence."

Some of the static works have augmented reality features -- coming alive when viewed through a smartphone screen -- and talks with artists are also planned during the three-week exhibition.

French artist Botchy-Botchy, 48, sold his first NFT at the Tokyo show.

"The real plus is that the artist gets royalties at each resale of its token," he said. And in the art industry, "that's really a new thing".

Bailey said he sees Beeple's massive sale as "an exception" and thinks greater value lies in the potential of NFTs to spark broader creativity.

"Maybe (Beeple's sale) was important to show the mainstream art world that it's a competitive thing... I see crypto art being the most powerful and meaningful when it's helping smaller artists," he said.


© Agence France-Presse










Today's News

June 30, 2021

Now you see the art. Now you don't.

Joan B Mirviss LTD opens summer group exhibition

Freud portrait of Hockney sells for £14.9 mn

One of Norway's most famous painted images to be offered by Sotheby's

VMFA announces international firm SmithGroup will design the museum's new wing

Exhibition at Marian Cramer Projects focuses on the depiction of modeling materials and their spatial properties

Selling exhibition features works from the collection of Peter O'Toole

Picasso painting found in Greek gorge years after heist

Sculpture from around the world in online selling exhibition

One of two known 'hero' phasers from the original 'Star Trek' series beams into Heritage Auctions

Detroit Institute of Arts acquires The Stewart & Stewart Archive

Christie's to offer works by six artists from an important private collection

Museum appoints Alphonso Atkins as Miller Worley Deputy Director for Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Access

New book offers a fresh look at the stories behind the art and history of tarot decks

Scott Kahn featured in Almine Rech's exclusive One by One online viewing room

From tattoos to tokens at Tokyo's first crypto art show

DC Moore Gallery exhibits a new body of work by Joyce Kozloff

Over 800 lots will be in Nye & Company's Summer Chic & Antique Estate Treasures auction

Baltimore Museum of Art receives major gift to support acquisitions for its African Art Collection

The Royal Scottish Academy presents an exhibition of interior objects and furniture

Galeria Jaqueline Martins celebrates its 10th anniversary with a show developed around Rafael França

Sargent's Daughters opens the first solo presentation of the work of Victoria Dugger

La Scala seeks new audiences with outdoor concerts

The Boss is back on Broadway. The workers are coming back, too.

Don't Drink Alcohol If You're Taking These 10 Medications

6 Ways to Show Support during Major Life Changes

Top 3 reasons to hire a crane

7 Strategies to Increase Your Tik Tok Engagement

How to make epoxy table top - step by step tutorial

Have heard of BONS blog?

Popstar NEO 10Y Fakes Own Death for World Peace




Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 



Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
(1941 - 2019)
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez

sa gaming free credit

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site Parroquia Natividad del Señor
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful