The First Art Newspaper on the Net    Established in 1996 Saturday, October 16, 2021


Unanimous vote is final step toward removing Roosevelt statue
A statue of Theodore Roosevelt in front of the American Museum of Natural History in New York, June 19, 2020. The New York City Public Design Commission voted unanimously at a public meeting on Monday to relocate the statue by long-term loan to a cultural institution dedicated to the life and legacy of the former president. Caitlin Ochs/The New York Times.

by Laura Zornosa



NEW YORK (NYT NEWS SERVICE).- After more than a year of talk, it’s official: The Theodore Roosevelt statue in front of the American Museum of Natural History is coming down.

The New York City Public Design Commission voted unanimously at a public meeting Monday to relocate the statue by long-term loan to a cultural institution dedicated to the life and legacy of the former president. (No institution has been designated yet, and discussions about its ultimate destination are ongoing.)

The vote follows years of protest and adverse public reaction over the statue as a symbol of colonialism, largely because of the Native American and African men who are depicted flanking Roosevelt on a horse. Those objections led the museum in June 2020 to propose removing the statue. New York City, which owns the building and property, agreed to the suggestion, and Mayor Bill de Blasio expressed his support.

In 2017, a mayoral commission set up to review city art, monuments and markers had considered historical research about the statue but could not reach a consensus on removing it.




“Height is power in public art, and Roosevelt’s stature on his noble steed visibly expresses dominance and superiority over the Native American and African figures,” the panel wrote in its report, delivered in January 2018.

At the time, about half of the commission wanted to relocate the sculpture, and about half recommended additional historical research before making a decision. Only a few members wanted to leave the statue where it was, if on-site context was provided.

At Monday’s meeting, made public as a YouTube video, Sam Biederman of the New York City Parks Department said that although the statue “was not erected with malice of intent,” its composition “supports a thematic framework of colonization and racism.”

The museum had spent years working with academics and advisers, both before and after the statue was considered by the mayor’s monuments commission. In 2019, that research culminated in an exhibition about the sculpture’s context and history — and how the public perceived it.

“The understanding of statues and monuments as powerful and hurtful symbols of systemic racism became even more evident in the wake of the movement for racial justice that emerged after the murder of George Floyd,” Dan Slippen, vice president of government relations at the museum, said at the meeting. “It has become clear that removing the statue would be a symbol of progress toward an inclusive and equitable community.”

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.










Today's News

June 24, 2021

Rembrandt's damaged masterpiece is whole again, with AI's help

In the West the looted bronzes are museum pieces. In Nigeria 'they are our ancestors.'

National Gallery of Canada unveils new brand image rooted in Indigenous ways of knowing and being

Iowa workshop whose pipe organs shook the world burns to the ground

Ancient sculptures prompt Germany to reckon with colonial past

Centre Pompidou gifted 921 works from Bruno Decharme's collection of outsider art

Significant collection of photographs from Stephen G. Stein given to National Gallery of Art

Nationalmuseum acquires Mary Cassatt painting

Oolite Arts announces 2021 acquisition of original works from seven Miami-based artists

Unanimous vote is final step toward removing Roosevelt statue

Phillips announces further highlights ahead of the London Design Auction

Photographs of Mike Jagger, David Bowie, Robert Plant and Elton John due to be sold at auction next month

Ben Elwes Fine Art to present a previously-unknown bust attributed to Margaret Foley

Christopher Myers now represented by James Cohan

Valentina Liernur's first exhibition in Asia opens at Simon Lee Gallery

The Crocker Art Museum appoints Rachel Gotlieb, Ph.D. as the first Ruth Rippon Curator of Ceramics

Historic Blakesley Hall opens in time for the summer holidays

Christie's first sale of The Roger Federer Collection totals US$ 1,853,149

Musical chairs? Swapping seats could reduce orchestra aerosols.

Storefronts turned stages for 'Seven Deadly Sins'

Galerie Gmurzynska presents Ahn Duong: "La Tentation d'Exister. There is always Champagne in the Fridge"

London orchestra's 'miracle' trip to France despite Covid, Brexit

UK festivals face Covid crisis without support say MPs

US comics legend Chris Ware wins top Angouleme prize

Stock market - what is worth knowing about it?

The Legal Regulation of Gambling in China

4 Tips for the Perfect Home Art Studio

Tattoo shop insurance

Zero to Hero: How Artists Are Using Nootropics To Access Cutting-Edge Level of Creativity

Displaying Lego Art like a Master

Choose Slot Pulsa and Make Easy Money

The Interior Design Ideas for your home

What Is Depression │ Definition, Symptoms, and Causes

Attractive Tourist Places in India




Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 



Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
(1941 - 2019)
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez

sa gaming free credit

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site Parroquia Natividad del Señor
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful