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PhotoGallery: The Colonial National Historical Park
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Visitors look at reproduction of common 17th century items at the Jamestown Settlement on August 19, 2019, in Williamsburg, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
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A census of Virginia and a muster of Virginia and showing Angela's, the first documented African woman (initially documented as Angelo) to arrive in the Virginia Colony and become a slave, name are seen at the Jamestown Settlement August 19, 2019, in Williamsburg, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
An exhibit showing life in Angola, Africa, is seen at the Jamestown Settlement August 19, 2019, in Williamsburg, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
A man looks at a census and a muster of Virginia which mentions Angela (initially documented as Angelo), the first documented African woman to arrive in the Virginia Colony, August 19, 2019, in Williamsburg, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
People view an exhibit about slavery at the Jamestown Settlement on August 19, 2019, in Williamsburg, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
People view an exhibit about slavery at the Jamestown Settlement on August 19, 2019, in Williamsburg, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
A man views an exhibit about Colonial Virginia at the Jamestown Settlement on August 19, 2019, in Williamsburg, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
A path is seen above what is believed to have been the road used by some of the first Africans, including Angela to arrive and become slaves in Virginia on the grounds of the Colonial National Historical Park, August 19, 2019, in Williamsburg, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
Archaeologist Charde Reid works at an archaeological dig site associated with Angela on the grounds of the Colonial National Historical Park, August 19, 2019, in Jamestown, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
An archeologist cleans up an area of a dig site associated with Angela on the grounds of the Colonial National Historical Park August 19, 2019, in Jamestown, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
Tourist walk a path believed to have been the road used by some of the first Africans, including Angela to arrive and become slaves in Virginia on the grounds of the Colonial National Historical Park, August 19, 2019, in Williamsburg, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
An archaeologist cleans what he believes is part of a drinking glass at a dig site associated with Angela on the grounds of the Colonial National Historical Park August 19, 2019, in Jamestown, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
Archaeologist Charde Reid carries tools at an archeological dig site associated with Angela on the grounds of the Colonial National Historical Park August 19, 2019, in Jamestown, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
An archaeologist organizes map drawings of a dig site associated with Angela on the grounds of the Colonial National Historical Park August 19, 2019, in Jamestown, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
An archaeologist covers a dig site associated with Angela on the grounds of the Colonial National Historical Park August 19, 2019, in Jamestown, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
Archaeologists work in an area of a dig site associated with Angela on the grounds of the Colonial National Historical Park, August 19, 2019, in Jamestown, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
Superintendent of Fort Monroe National Monument, Terry E. Brown, poses near a historical marker at the fort, August 19, 2019, in Hampton, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
Superintendent of Fort Monroe National Monument, Terry E. Brown, points to a historical marker at the fort, August 19, 2019, in Hampton, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
Archaeologist, Charde Reid (C) helps her colleagues cover a dig site associated with Angela on the grounds of the Colonial National Historical Park August 19, 2019, in Jamestown, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
Superintendent of Fort Monroe National Monument, Terry E. Brown, poses near a historical marker at the fort, August 19, 2019, in Hampton, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
Superintendent of Fort Monroe National Monument, Terry E. Brown, poses near a historical marker at the fort, August 19, 2019, in Hampton, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.
ArtDaily
Superintendent of Fort Monroe National Monument, Terry E. Brown, poses near a historical marker at the fort, August 19, 2019, in Hampton, Virginia. Archaeologist in historic Jamestown are working hard to retrace bits of the life of Angela, who arrived in Jamestown from Africa 400 years ago. Angela (initially documented as Angelo) was one of the first African slaves known to reach the first permanent English settlement in North America, which would later be part of the United States. Brendan Smialowski / AFP.

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