The First Art Newspaper on the Net    Established in 1996 Wednesday, January 26, 2022


National Gallery of Art announces new acquisitions
Jean Dughet, after Nicolas Poussin, Baptism, from The Seven Sacraments, c. 1650. Etching with engraving on two sheets of laid paper, 62 × 79.1 cm (24 7/16 × 31 1/8 in.) National Gallery of Art, Washington Pepita Milmore Memorial Fund 2020.102.1



WASHINGTON, DC.- The National Gallery of Art has acquired The Stoning of Saint Stephen (c. 1602) by Aurelio Lomi (1556–1622), the leading painter in Pisa during the last quarter of the 16th century. It joins two other works by Lomi in the Gallery’s collection: a figure study in chalk, Studies of a Youth Pulling Ropes (recto); Faint Study of a Youth Pulling a Rope (verso) (1610s), and a small monochrome bozzetto of the Visitation, a preparatory work for a Florence altarpiece from around 1590.

The Stoning of Saint Stephen, a large study in oil on four joined sheets of paper, depicts the martyrdom of one of Genoa’s patron saints. The composition refers to a touchstone for the entire school: Giulio Romano’s altarpiece from c. 1521 in the church of Santo Stefano. The study is closely related to Lomi’s altarpiece for the church of Santa Maria della Pace (now in Genoa’s Musei Civici). Besides composition and subject, the two works share certain distinctive details, such as the luminous celestial sphere. However, the study is more expansive and densely populated than the altarpiece, suggesting it may have been an autonomous work.

Created while Lomi was living in Genoa (1597–c. 1604), this work is an exquisite example of the artist’s meticulously constructed compositions and figures, as well as his ability to create works suffused with light. It epitomizes the transition from the stylization of late mannerism to the more naturalistic light, movement, and texture of baroque style.

The National Gallery of Art also acquired Jean Dughet’s (1619–1679) The Seven Sacraments (c. 1650), a rare complete set of etchings after Nicolas Poussin’s (1594–1665) paintings of the seven sacraments. There are only three other known complete sets of these prints in the collections of the Bibliothèque nationale de France, the British Museum, and the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts.

Poussin painted a first set of The Seven Sacraments in 1638–1642 and a second set in 1644–1648. He made the first set for Cassiano dal Pozzo, secretary to Cardinal Francesco Barberini and one of Poussin’s most important patrons. Cassiano took an active interest in the early history of Christianity and most likely suggested the almost unprecedented subject to Poussin. Dughet, Poussin’s secretary and brother-in-law, made these large-scale etchings after the first set of paintings, which were hung in Cassiano’s home. Baptism is the first plate in the series and features an elaborate dedication to Cassiano at upper left; the other prints are sequenced according to numbers etched at lower center. Dughet recorded the exact compositions in all of Poussin’s paintings except for Ordination, in which he incorporated the landscape background from Poussin’s second painting of this sacrament.

These are the first works by Dughet to enter the collection. They expand the Gallery’s holdings of 17th-century French art, which include Poussin’s painting The Baptism of Christ (1641/1642), from Cassiano’s first set of The Seven Sacraments.

National Gallery Acquires Its First Painting by Yvonne Thomas
Yvonne Thomas (1913–2009) is among several important artists from the abstract expressionist era, many of them women, who have been rediscovered in recent years. Portrait (1956), a pivotal work in Thomas’s career, is the first of her paintings to enter the Gallery’s collection and joins an untitled screenprint from 1967.

In 1938 Thomas studied fine art at the Art Students League of New York as well as with Amédée Ozenfant in his atelier. She began to associate with the abstract expressionists, joining discussions at The Club (where she was one of the few members who were women) and at the short-lived school called The Subjects of the Artist. She also studied in Provincetown with Hans Hofmann and exhibited at the renowned Ninth Street Exhibition in 1951. Throughout her work, she combined the gestural language of the New York School painters with sensitive brushstrokes and a lyrical sense of color. In Portrait, the ghostly figurative suggestions and tinted grays evoke an image coming into focus. The painting resonates with works by Judith Godwin, Jack Tworkov, and Frank Lobdell in the Gallery’s collection.










Today's News

January 26, 2021

Rare violin tests Germany's commitment to atone for its Nazi past

National Gallery of Art announces new acquisitions

In Ice Age Siberia, a meeting of carnivores may have given us dogs

Asia Week New York zooms-in on the allure of Indian painting

David Nolan Gallery announces the death of Barry Le Va

Chairwoman of San Francisco art school facing budget issues resigns

Exhibition of sculptures by Sarah Lucas on view at Contemporary Fine Arts

John Mendelsohn's first solo exhibition at David Richard Gallery opens in New York

Exhibition at Gladstone Gallery presents Shirin Neshat's latest body of work, Land of Dreams

He Xiangyu's first solo show in the United States opens at Andrew Kreps Gallery

The Snite Museum of Art acquires a work by Magnum photographer Alex Majoli from The Eye of the Storm series

Austrian artist and Holocaust survivor Arik Brauer dies

Edmund de Waal donates library of exile to Mosul following exhibition at the British Museum

The Metropolitan Opera hires its first Chief Diversity Officer

Junior Mance, jazz pianist who played with giants, dies at 92

ASU Art Museum opens "Body/Magic" a new exhibition by artist Liz Cohen

Collectors go bananas and pay nearly $400,000 for Del Monte-stickered $20 bill

Elias Rahbani, Lebanese composer who sought new sounds, dies at 82

A monument honoring Brooklyn abolitionists stalls under scrutiny

Climate change is worsening. So the weather station is singing about it.

Christie's to offer the Collection of Lucien and Edmonde Treillard

Song Yoo-jung, South Korean actor, is found dead at 26

Shulamit Nazarian presents a series of new paintings by New York-based artist Michael Stamm

Marianne Boesky presents a selection of recent paintings from Suzanne McClelland's MUTE series

Art and online sports betting in Indiana - joy to the people

Nine tips to decorate the Tv mounted wall




Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 



Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
(1941 - 2019)
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez

sa gaming free credit

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site Parroquia Natividad del Señor
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful