The First Art Newspaper on the Net    Established in 1996 Tuesday, September 21, 2021


Great Barrier Reef avoids UNESCO 'in danger' listing
This file photograph taken on November 20, 2014 shows an aerial view of the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of the Whitsunday Islands, along the central coast of Queensland. At a World Heritage Committee meeting chaired by China, delegates voted not to downgrade the reef to "in danger", after a concerted lobbying effort by Canberra. on July 23, 2021. Sarah LAI / AFP.

by Holly Robertson



BRISBANE (AFP).- Australia on Friday avoided having the Great Barrier Reef listed as an endangered world heritage site by UNESCO, despite extensive climate change-fuelled damage to the ecosystem's corals.

After a concerted lobbying effort by Canberra, members of the World Heritage Committee -- including leading fossil fuel producers Russia and Saudi Arabia -- voted to give Australian conservation efforts more time.

The group brushed aside UNESCO experts' recommendation that the reef's World Heritage status be downgraded because of dramatic coral decline, instead telling Australia to report on the reef's status by 2022.

The 2,300-kilometre-long (1,400-mile-long) ecosystem has suffered three mass coral bleaching events since 2016, caused by rising ocean temperatures due to global warming.

Areas once teeming with vibrant corals have become lifeless washed-out wastelands, and two-thirds of the reef is believed to have been damaged in some way.

Despite the damage, the reef remains a vital tourist draw for Australia, which had feared an "in danger" label could deter post-pandemic visitors.

Australia's environment minister Sussan Ley had flown to Paris earlier this month to personally lobby member states on the committee, while key ambassadors were invited on a reef snorkelling trip.

On Friday, Ley welcomed the decision, thanking "esteemed delegates for recognising Australia's commitment to protecting the Great Barrier Reef".

'Day of infamy'

Environmental groups decried the decision as a political stitch-up.

"This is a victory for one of the most cynical lobbying efforts in recent history," said Greenpeace Australia Pacific CEO David Ritter.

"This is not an achievement -- it is a day of infamy for the Australian government."




A decision on the reef's status had already been postponed from 2015, when Australia successfully waged a similar diplomatic campaign and committed billions of dollars to reef protection.

"This is history repeating itself," said Climate Council spokesman Will Steffen.

"Australia must stop censoring science, and start taking the steps we know are required to help protect the reef," he added.

Though Australian government scientists say corals have shown signs of recovery in the past 12 months, they admit the reef's long-term outlook remains "very poor".

As well as coral bleaching, the reef is also susceptible to damage from cyclones and outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish, which eat the coral.

UNESCO had accused Australia of failing to meet key water quality and land management targets, while also taking aim at the country's conservative government for its lacklustre climate efforts.

Canberra is facing growing international criticism for refusing to commit to net zero emissions by 2050.

The government has said it hopes to meet the target "as soon as possible" without harming the country's fossil fuel-reliant economy.

The World Heritage Committee asked UNESCO to send a monitoring mission to inspect the reef, after Canberra criticised the agency for relying on existing reports to make its recommendation.

The decision comes after Venice also dodged the endangered list on Thursday, following Italy's move to ban large cruise ships from sailing into the city centre.

However, Liverpool's waterfront was deleted from the list entirely, amid concerns about overdevelopment, including plans for a new football stadium.


© Agence France-Presse










Today's News

July 24, 2021

A painting or an NFT of it: Which will be more valuable?

Jewish burial records among items seized by U.S. authorities

Ed Atkins and his mum are starring in a museum show

Frist Art Museum opens major Kara Walker exhibition

Splash of colour: UK beach huts brighten pandemic gloom

Suzanne Cotter appointed new Director of the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia

White House on defensive over Hunter Biden art sales

Salzburg festival hall, a world temple in the sound of music

Vladimir Menshov, surprise Russian Oscar winner, dies at 81

Fans honour Amy Winehouse in London decade after her death

Meadows Museum announces appointment of two curatorial fellows

Maureen Paley opens a solo exhibition of works by Sarah Jones

Belvedere 21 presents 'Lois Weinberger: Basics'

Rare Campaign sofa comes up for auction at Bellmans

'En Plein Air Reloaded: Green Fuse' opens at Black & White Gallery / Project Space

Transformed Asian Art Museum unveils new pavilion with teamLab: Continuity

Nobel Prize awarded to immunogeneticist George Snell in 1980 to be auctioned

Romania mining town Rosia Montana eyes UNESCO restart

The music scene in this Brooklyn neighborhood is here to stay

At Salzburg, Don Giovanni gets no pleasure from seducing

A violinist on how to empower Asian musicians

Oscar Murillo unveils his global project Frequencies at his former school in Hackney

Great Barrier Reef avoids UNESCO 'in danger' listing

Avignon Festival forges ahead, despite virus restrictions

How to Improve Your Creative Skills?

Selecting The Best Bathroom Accessories

How Do You Pick The Best Windows For Your Home?

Is There A Chance I Could Lose My Job For A DUI?

If I've Been In A Vehicle Accident, Do I Need A Lawyer?

What Are The Costs Involved In Window Installation?

How Do I Go About Finding The Right Window/Door Materials?

Tips to Select the Perfect Gift For a Picky Individual




Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 



Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
(1941 - 2019)
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez

sa gaming free credit

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site Parroquia Natividad del Señor
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful