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Jenness Cortez "Requiem" painting to be auctioned at the C.M. Russell Museum on March 19
In “Requiem,” as in all her paintings, artist Jenness Cortez continues to play the role of author, visual journalist, art historian, curator and pundit.


AVERILL PARK, NY .- The C. M. Russell Museum of Great Falls, Montana, will auction an important painting entitled “Requiem” by internationally acclaimed artist Jenness Cortez at its annual exhibition and sale March 19, 2016. In “Requiem,” Cortez uses Albert Bierstadt’s final great western landscape “The Last of the Buffalo” as her own painting’s focal point to pay homage to the culture of the Native Peoples of the American plains. But to bolster Bierstadt’s tribute to the buffalo and Native American culture, Cortez has added a steam locomotive and train to the painting’s middle ground--intending to emphatically illustrate the force and inevitability of the white man's conquest of the plains.

In “Requiem,” as in all her paintings, artist Jenness Cortez continues to play the role of author, visual journalist, art historian, curator and pundit to help open our eyes to what we might otherwise have overlooked or taken for granted. To help tell her Native Peoples’ story more completely, she complements Bierstadt’s 1888 masterpiece with other iconic images from Frederic Remington, Charles Russell, James Earle Fraser, John Mix Stanley, Alfred Jacob Miller and George Catlin. Then, to further enrich her visual conversation, Cortez includes 28 books that relate to her message. And two books depicted in the bookcase are of special note: "Black Earth" and "Winnetou.” In "Black Earth," contemporary Yale historian Timothy Snyder draws eerie parallels between the U. S. government's policy of Manifest Destiny and the philosophy eventually espoused by the Third Reich of Nazi Germany. Karl May's spectacularly popular novels, like "Winnetou,” romanticized the American West for millions of German children (among them the young Adolph Hitler) at the turn of the twentieth century. Snyder posits that Hitler, an avowed life-long fan of May's books, saw in May's description of U. S. policy the model for conquering territory through the extermination of native peoples.

In this new Cortez painting, the artist continues to reexamine the classic paradox of realism: the painting both as a “window” into an imagined space and as a physical object. In summarizing her creative process, Cortez explains, “Every painting begins with a vision seen in the artist’s mind, and “Requiem” is no exception. Sometimes the finished piece appears in the mind full-blown, and at other times it is amorphous––yet with some beguiling character that begs to be developed. In either case, between that first inspiration and the finished painting lie hours of research, thousands of choices and, of course, the great joy of painting. The process is organic. Even with a well-conceived composition in place, the painting has a life of its own and the best ones surprise even the artist with twists and turns that outshine the most clever of plans. It’s as if the creative spirit insinuates itself into the work, wanting to serve its own best interest with solutions that far exceed the artist’s original, limited vision.”

For centuries artists have been challenging their intellects and skills by paying homage to the painters who preceded them. Today, Jenness Cortez has emerged as the twenty-first century’s most notable exponent of this facet of art history. Her masterful work, now expanded to include the genre of Western art, gives Cortez solid footing in the colorful lineage of artists who have appropriated vintage images and woven them into their own distinctive, recognizable fabric.

By continuing to masterfully present iconic works in unexpected modern settings, Jenness Cortez truly inspires us to see differently––to rediscover, revalue and reintegrate our own intuitive resources into the hurried regimen of modern American life.

Jenness Cortez was born in 1944 in Frankfort, Indiana. She received her B.F.A. from the Herron School of Art in Indianapolis, apprenticed privately with noted Dutch painter Antonius Raemaekers and later studied with Arnold Blanch at the Art Students League of New York. Her work is in numerous public and private collections including those of Presidents Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton, HM Queen Elizabeth, II and the New York State Museum. Miss Cortez is represented by Perlmutter Gallery in Averill Park, New York.





Today's News

March 16, 2016

Hotel Drouot auction house porters on trial for stealing 250 tonnes of valuables

Surviving Shakespeare script "The Book of Sir Thomas More" urges empathy for foreigners

Hauser Wirth & Schimmel opens to the public in the Los Angeles Downtown Arts District

In preventive excavation realized by INRAP, a bird found to be among the earliest art

10 buzzy contemporary Asian works of art being offered at Asia Week New York

Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center acquires work by acclaimed French symbolist painter Gustave Moreau

Jenness Cortez "Requiem" painting to be auctioned at the C.M. Russell Museum on March 19

Tenth edition of Art Dubai, taking place at Madinat Jumeirah, opens with largest and most global edition to date

Exhibition of new sculpture and works on paper by sculptor Jeff Lowe opens at Pangolin London

Exhibition of new work on Echizen kozo washi paper by Richard Gorman opens at Kerlin Gallery

Nassau County Museum of Art opens exhibition of works by Kenny Scharf

Rolls-Royce Art Programme announces a new commission by Emirati artist Mohammed Kazem

Michael Janssen opens first solo exhibition in Germany with Norwegian painter Lars Elling

Everson Museum of Art announces new curator

La Salle University Art Museum opens spring exhibitions

Solo exhibition by London-based artist Sidsel Meineche Hansen opens at Gasworks

The New York Public Library appoints Tony Ageh Chief Digital Officer

Zack Seckler's first photographic exhibition opens at the Robin Rice Gallery

Rashid Rana announced as Artistic Director of the inaugural Lahore Biennale

Artists transform the pages of books and newspapers into unique works of wearable art jewelry

The "Anything Goes" Museum exhibition prepared by children

Solo exhibition of new works by artist Abdolreza Aminlari on view at Taymour Grahne Gallery

Some of the best emerging young artists exhibit their work at the National Gallery of Victoria

The Schirn presents a digital self-portrait of Florian Meisenberg

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