The First Art Newspaper on the Net Established in 1996 United States Friday, October 31, 2014


Smithsonian launches Global Marine Biodiversity Project with $10 million donation
Coral reef biota including sponges, gorgonians and corals at 50 feet underwater at Promontory Point near Carrie Bow Cay Research Station, Belize, 2008. Photo: Chip Clark, Smithsonian.
WASHINGTON, DC.- The Smithsonian announced that it will launch a major long-term project to study coastal marine biodiversity and ecosystems around the globe. The project is made possible by a $10 million donation from Suzanne and Michael Tennenbaum, senior managing partner of Los Angeles-based Tennenbaum Capital Partners and philanthropist. The goal of the project—Smithsonian’s Tennenbaum Marine Observatories—is to monitor the ocean’s coastal ecosystems over a long period of time.

The Tennenbaum Marine Observatories will be the first worldwide network of coastal ecological field sites, standardizing measurements of biological change. By studying sites with Smithsonian experts in biology, ecology and anthropology, and using technologies like DNA sequencing, the project will provide an unprecedented understanding of how marine biodiversity is affected by local human activities and global change, such as ocean warming, acidification and rising sea levels.

“As our coasts undergo accelerating change due to human activity and the effects of climate change, it is more important than ever to monitor and understand the ocean’s biodiversity,” said Smithsonian Secretary Wayne Clough. “We are grateful to Michael and Suzanne for this donation, which allows the Smithsonian to focus its unique expertise and strength in long-term research.”

The project will have five field sites: the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Md., on the Chesapeake Bay, the Institution’s marine station at Fort Pierce, Fla., Carrie Bow Cay in Belize and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute’s two locations in Panama—Bocas Del Toro on the Caribbean and Naos station on the Pacific. As the project grows, the Smithsonian will establish additional research sites with collaborators around the globe to monitor coastal ocean health, with the goal of at least 10 new sites within the next decade.

As part of the project, scientists will create plots at each site where the diversity and abundance of marine organisms will be recorded on a regular basis. These measurements will be complemented by other standardized observations and experiments. By studying each site using the same methods over a long period of time, scientists will be able to build a comparative database. The data will allow scientists—for the first time—to comprehensively study environmental change around the world’s coasts.

“For most of my life, I have lived near the water,” said Michael Tennenbaum. “I was—for a short while—a lifeguard and a swimming instructor. For 25 years, I have loved scuba diving and have dived all over the world. I feel most at home when floating underwater.

“I believe that the Smithsonian has the best chance to do this job. It’s one of the largest research organizations in the world and already does similar research. And the Smithsonian has identified this area as a key focus going forward. Its leader, my good friend Wayne Clough, feels passionately about creating a global marine observatory. This is such a huge task, passion will be needed.”

The ocean covers 70 percent of the planet’s surface and plays a key role in the global ecosystem. Nearly two-thirds of the world’s population lives within 100 miles of a coastline, yet there is no long-term data on the ocean.

By documenting changes in marine biodiversity and coastal ecosystems, the Tennenbaum Marine Observatories project will position the Smithsonian to provide the long-term data and understanding that are critical to address current and future challenges to sustaining a healthy ocean.

The Tennenbaum Marine Observatories initiative is based on a similar above-water project—the Smithsonian Institution Global Earth Observatories (known as SIGEO)—that includes 47 land plots around the globe where scientists have been monitoring and comparing dynamics of forested habitats for 35 years. Due to its success, the Smithsonian is using it as the model to look at the marine realm now.

“For years I have watched how standardized observations made around the globe have transformed our understanding of how tropical forests work,” said Nancy Knowlton, the Sant Chair for Marine Science at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. “We will now be able to do the same thing for the ocean, with this MarineGEO, taking advantage of the latest technologies that allow us to keep track of everything from microbes to whales.”

The Smithsonian is uniquely qualified to conduct such an ambitious marine project because of its wide range of expertise and collections.

The Smithsonian has developed clear goals for the Tennenbaum Marine Observatories. The donation will provide funding for the establishment of research sites and the beginnings of the coastal marine database. The information that scientists gather will continually provide a greater understanding of how coastal ecosystems function, which in turn can help improve how these areas are used and managed.

Tennenbaum is senior managing partner and founder of Tennenbaum Capital Partners LLC, which manages funds with assets of about $5 billion. Previously, Tennenbaum was a Wall Street executive where he managed various departments of a major investment bank. He has served on the boards of a number of public and private companies, including the Smithsonian National Board.

A graduate of the Georgia Institute of Technology with a degree in industrial engineering, Tennenbaum received a Masters of Business Administration from Harvard University. He is a member of the Academy of Distinguished Engineering Alumni of Georgia Tech’s College of Engineering and founder of the Tennenbaum Institute for Enterprise Transformation at the Georgia Tech School of Industrial and Systems Engineering.





Today's News

October 27, 2012

Archaeologists in Guatemala excavate Mayan ruler's tomb built between 700 and 400 B.C.

Dallas Museum of Art discovers George Inness painting "In the Woods" in the Collection

Christie's to offer Franz Kline's most important work ever presented at auction

Looters strip Bulgaria of ancient treasures; Powerless to prevent the rape of its sites

Exhibition of new works by the inimitable American artist Red Grooms opens at Marlborough

Behind, Before and Around Portraiture" on view at Tatiana Kourochkina Contemporary Art Project

Sotheby's London to sell Portrait of Kate Perugini, Daughter of Charles Dickens, by Sir John Everett Millais

Christie's launches '90s to Now', a new concept of sale dedicated to art created from 1990 to the present

Phillips de Pury & Company announces highlights from its London November Photographs Auction

UBS Wealth Management Director Doug Woodham appointed President of Christie's Americas

Art Gallery of South Australia announces that artist Trevor Nickolls has died at age 63

First exhibition devoted emphatically to Heinz Mack's relationship with Berlin opens at Arndt

The Whitney presents a major retrospective of the art of Richard Artschwager

Smithsonian launches Global Marine Biodiversity Project with $10 million donation

Massive, iconic Civil War flag on display at the New York State Museum

Rare Gustav Klimt monograph sets auction record at Swann Galleries

China wants to stop profiteering at temple sites

Vast Broadway costume collection on display in Florida

Museum debuts epic exhibit that expands the definition of Western American art

Spain's 2012 Prince of Asturias awards handed out; Architect Rafael Moneo honored in the arts category

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Image of a Christ without a beard, short hair and wearing a toga unearthed in Spain

2.- Giant mosaic unearthed in mysterious tomb in Amphipolis in northern Macedonia

3.- Bonhams sale of 18th century French decorative arts to benefit Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco

4.- Paris flustered by erection of 'sex-toy' sculpture; Paul McCarthy slapped by a passer-by

5.- High art or vile pornography? Marquis de Sade explored in Orsay museum exhibition

6.- 'Cubism: The Leonard A. Lauder Collection' opens at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

7.- Greek culture minister says Elgin Marbles return a matter of 'global heritage'

8.- Vandals deflate Paris 'sex-toy' sculpture by American artist Paul McCarthy after outrage

9.- Exhibition at National Gallery in London explores Rembrandt's final years of painting

10.- 'Hans Memling: A Flemish Renaissance' opens at the Scuderie del Quirinale in Rome



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez - Marketing: Carla Gutiérrez
Special Contributor: Liz Gangemi - Special Advisor: Carlos Amador
Contributing Editor: Carolina Farias

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org theavemaria.org juncodelavega.org facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site