The First Art Newspaper on the Net Established in 1996 United States Thursday, December 25, 2014


National Museum of Health and Medicine Chicago: Einstein's brain is now interactive iPad app
This digitized image made from a screen shot of a new iPad app, provided Sept. 24, 2012 by the National Museum of Health and Medicine Chicago, shows an image of brain tissue from renowned theoretical physicist Albert Einstein. The new application to be released Tuesday, Sept. 25 will allow users to see Einstein's brain as if they were looking through a microscope. The application promises to make detailed images of his brain more accessible to scientists than ever before. Teachers, students and anyone who's curious also can get a look. AP Photo/Courtesy the National Museum of Health and Medicine Chicago.

By: Carla K. Johnson, AP Medical Writer

CHICAGO (AP).- The brain that revolutionized physics now can be downloaded as an app for $9.99. But it won't help you win at Angry Birds.

While Albert Einstein's genius isn't included, an exclusive iPad application launched Tuesday promises to make detailed images of his brain more accessible to scientists than ever before. Teachers, students and anyone who's curious also can get a look.

A medical museum under development in Chicago obtained funding to scan and digitize nearly 350 fragile and priceless slides made from slices of Einstein's brain after his death in 1955. The application will allow researchers and novices to peer into the eccentric Nobel winner's brain as if they were looking through a microscope.

"I can't wait to find out what they'll discover," said Steve Landers, a consultant for the National Museum of Health and Medicine Chicago who designed the app. "I'd like to think Einstein would have been excited."

After Einstein died, a pathologist named Thomas Harvey performed an autopsy, removing the great man's brain in hopes that future researchers could discover the secrets behind his genius.

Harvey gave samples to researchers and collaborated on a 1999 study published in the Lancet. That study showed a region of Einstein's brain — the parietal lobe — was 15 percent wider than normal. The parietal lobe is important to the understanding of math, language and spatial relationships.

The new iPad app may allow researchers to dig even deeper by looking for brain regions where the neurons are more densely connected than normal, said Dr. Phillip Epstein, a Chicago-area neuroscientist and consultant for the museum.

But because the tissue was preserved before modern imaging technology, it may be difficult for scientists to figure out exactly where in Einstein's brain each slide originated. Although the new app organizes the slides into general brain regions, it doesn't map them with precision to an anatomical model.

"They didn't have MRI. We don't have a three-dimensional model of the brain of Einstein, so we don't know where the samples were taken from," said researcher Jacopo Annese of the Brain Observatory at the University of California, San Diego. What's more, the 1-inch-by-3-inch Einstein slides on the app represent only a fraction of the entire brain, Annese said.

Annese has preserved and digitized another famous brain, that of Henry Molaison, who died in 2008 after living for decades with profound amnesia. Known as "H.M." in scientific studies, Molaison participated during his life in research that revealed new insights on learning and memory.

A searchable website with images of more than 2,400 slides of Molaison's entire brain will be available to the public in December, Annese said.

"There will be another Einstein and we'll do it like H.M.," Annese predicted. For now, he said, it's exciting that the Einstein brain tissue has been preserved digitally before the slides deteriorate or become damaged. The app will spark interest in the field of brain research, just because it's Einstein, he said.

"It's a beautiful collection to have opened up to the public," Annese said.

Some may question whether Einstein would have wanted images of his remains sold to non-scientists for $9.99.

"There's been a lot of debate over what Einstein's intentions were," museum board member Jim Paglia said. "We know he didn't want a circus made of his remains. But he understood the value to research and science to study his brain, and we think we've addressed that in a respectful manner."

Paglia said the app could "inspire a whole new generation of neuroscientists."

Proceeds from sales will go to the U.S. Department of Defense's National Museum of Health and Medicine in Silver Spring, Md., and to the Chicago satellite museum, which is set to open in 2015 with interactive exhibits and the museum's digital collections.

.


Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.





Today's News

September 26, 2012

Le Stanze del Vetro opens new space with exhibition of 300 works by Carlo Scarpa

Property from the Estate of Brooke Astor totals $18.8 million at Sotheby's in New York

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston debuts only gallery dedicated to coins at a major U.S. art museum

Storm clouds lift over J M W Turner paintings at National Museum Cardiff in Wales

Distinguished private collections and standalone works illuminate Christie's October photographs sale

National Museum of Health and Medicine Chicago: Einstein's brain is now interactive iPad app

Seminal sculpture by American artist Ellsworth Kelly is installed in museum's sculpture garden

"Thomas Schütte: Faces & Figures" opens at the Serpentine Gallery in London

The Art of Protection: Auction of the Collection of Karsten Klingbeil in Munich Part II

Julien's Auctions announces sale of property from the collection of Ronnie and Jo Wood

Hans P. Kraus Jr. Fine Photographs presents "Talbot's World: A Gallery of Natural Magic"

Christie's Geneva to offer Eric Clapton watch in its upcoming auction of Important Watches

Zurich Asia to offer rare stamps of imperial & modern China in October Hong Kong auction

The Fondation Gandur pour l'Art gives the public online access to its collections

Jessie Willcox Smith's Goldilocks and the Three Bears tops Heritage Auctions' Oct. 13 Illustration event

The sky is falling: Largest piece of the Moon ever offered in Heritage Auctions' New York Event

NEA presents a new systems map to guide research agenda over the next five years

National Portrait Gallery saves UK's last portrait of the British radical who helped create the U.S.A.

Manchester Contemporary announces details of the fourth edition of the art fair

"David Claerbout: The time that remains" on view at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Colossal statue of Amenhotep III unveiled on the west bank of the Nile in Egypt

2.- British royals crown New York visit with gala dinner

3.- Missing artwork rediscovered in "Stuart Little" sells for over 200,000 euros at auction

4.- Rossetti's Venus Verticordia soars at Sotheby's in London to sell for £2.88 million

5.- Russian magnate buys, then returns Nobel prize to American geneticist James Watson

6.- Egyptian Museum unveils four newly renovated halls of the famed Tutankhamun gallery

7.- 'The Secret of Dresden: From Rembrandt to Canaletto' on view at the Groninger Museum

8.- Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum reopens after three-year renovation

9.- More than 200 queries about works by possible heirs received on Nazi-era art hoard

10.- Attorney, artist and filmmaker reflects on the seven lessons learned at 2014 Art Basel Miami Beach



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez - Marketing: Carla Gutiérrez
Special Contributor: Liz Gangemi - Special Advisor: Carlos Amador
Contributing Editor: Carolina Farias

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org theavemaria.org juncodelavega.org facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site