The First Art Newspaper on the Net   Established in 1996 United States Monday, November 30, 2015

Some of the oldest known corncobs, husks, stalks and tassels discovered in Peru
Cobs date roughly from 6,500-4,000 years ago from the "A" to the "C". A is Proto-Confite Morocho race; B, Confite Chavinense maize race; C, Proto-Alazan maize race.
WASHINGTON, DC.- People living along the coast of Peru were eating popcorn 1,000 years earlier than previously reported and before ceramic pottery was used there, according to a new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences co-authored by Dolores Piperno, curator of New World archaeology at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and emeritus staff scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

Some of the oldest known corncobs, husks, stalks and tassels (male flowers), dating from 6,700 to 3,000 years ago were found at Paredones and Huaca Prieta, two mound sites on Peru’s arid northern coast. The research group, led by Tom Dillehay from Vanderbilt University and Duccio Bonavia from Peru’s Academia Nacional de la Historia, also found corn microfossils: starch grains and phytoliths. Characteristics of the cobs—the earliest ever discovered in South America—indicate that the sites’ ancient inhabitants ate corn several ways, including popcorn and flour corn. However, corn was still not an important part of their diet.

“Corn was first domesticated in Mexico nearly 9,000 years ago from a wild grass called teosinte,” said Piperno. “Our results show that only a few thousand years later corn arrived in South America where its evolution into different varieties that are now common in the Andean region began. This evidence further indicates that in many areas corn arrived before pots did and that early experimentation with corn as a food was not dependent on the presence of pottery.”

Understanding the subtle transformations in the characteristics of cobs and kernels that led to the hundreds of maize races known today, as well as where and when each of them developed, is a challenge. Corncobs and kernels were not well preserved in the humid tropical forests between Central and South America, including Panama—the primary dispersal routes for the crop after it first left Mexico about 8,000 years ago.

“These new and unique races of corn may have developed quickly in South America, where there was no chance that they would continue to be pollinated by wild teosinte,” said Piperno. “Because there is so little data available from other places for this time period, the wealth of morphological information about the cobs and other corn remains at this early date is very important for understanding how corn became the crop we know today.”

Today's News

January 19, 2012

A selection of treasures from the Khalili Collection to be shown at the British Museum

Exhibition of recent work by Spanish artist Juan Genovés at Marlborough Gallery

Some of the oldest known corncobs, husks, stalks and tassels discovered in Peru

Sotheby's to offer 13 works from the Forbes Collection depicting the Franco-Prussian War

Largest and most colourful lithographs ever made by David Hockney at Alan Cristea Gallery

Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art and Detroit Institute of Arts collaborate with shared curatorial expertise

Exhibition of photographs by Paul Strand and Henri Cartier-Bresson opens in Paris

Hotel in Australia offers its guests the chance to try and steal a work of art by Banksy

America's leading art galleries to exhibit 30 solo-artist booths and 42 thematic installations

Tate appoints José Roca as Estrellita B. Brodsky Adjunct Curator of Latin American Art

Breach: An exhibition at Rod Barton Gallery in London focuses on four young artists

Artpace in San Antonio announces curator Regine Basha as new Executive Director

Valencian Institute of Modern Art opens exhibition of the sculpture of Arturo Berned

A seductive collection of portraits and nudes from the iconic Herb Ritts to be published by The Getty

Canadian museum partnership prepares Haida exhibition for European tour

Ray doubted jury would believe an MLK conspiracy

Impulses II: A solo show by Jordanian artist Hilda Hiary at Ayyam Gallery Beirut

La Salle University Art Museum presents the work of Philadelphia-based artist Jane Irish

Private collection of Morgans to sell at Bonhams flagship February car sale

The Nancy Graves Foundation appoints Christina Hunter as New Director

Most Popular Last Seven Days

1.- First solo exhibition by the American artist Mickalene Thomas in Belgium opens at Galerie Nathalie Obadia

2.- Israel accidentally finds ancient mosaic that served as pavement for a courtyard in a villa

3.- The address of Johannes Vermeer's the Little Street discovered by Rijksmuseum curator

4.- The nine lives of Russia's Hermitage cats that root out unwanted guests: Rodents

5.- Robbers make off with masterpieces by Rubens and Tintoretto from museum in Verona

6.- 17th century letters at Museum of Communication reveal refugees 'sense of loss'

7.- New museum dedicated to the artist Mu Xin opens in Zhejiang Province, China

8.- Who are the most prolific art collectors in the US today?

9.- Rubens House brings newly discovered study for a portrait by Van Dyck to Antwerp

10.- "The Nude in the XX and XXI century" curated by Jane Neal opens at Sotheby's S/2 London

Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .


Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher:Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez
Social Network Manager and Translator: Norma Cristina Pérez Ayala Cano

Royalville Communications, Inc
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
to a Mexican poet.

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful