The First Art Newspaper on the Net   Established in 1996 United States Monday, September 16, 2019


India limits visitors to save Taj Mahal
Crowds gather to visit the Taj Mahal in Agra on January 3, 2018. India is to restrict the number of daily visitors to the Taj Mahal in an effort to preserve the iconic 17th-century monument to love, its biggest tourist draw. Millions of mostly Indian tourists visit the Taj Mahal every year and their numbers are increasing steadily as domestic travel becomes more accessible. DOMINIQUE FAGET / AFP.

by Abhaya Srivastava


AGRA (AFP).- India is to restrict the number of daily visitors to the Taj Mahal in an attempt to preserve the iconic 17th-century monument to love, its biggest tourist attraction.

Millions of mostly Indian tourists visit the Taj Mahal every year and their numbers are increasing steadily as domestic travel becomes easier.

Experts say the vast crowds increase wear and tear on the white marble tomb, which already must undergo regular cleaning to stop it turning yellow from polluted air, and could put pressure on its foundations.

In future only 40,000 local tourists will be allowed to enter the historic complex per day, authorities said Wednesday.

"We have to ensure the safety of the monument and visitors as well. Crowd management was emerging as a big challenge for us," an official with the Archeological Survey of India -- which controls the monument -- told AFP on condition of anonymity.

The restrictions will not apply to foreigners, who pay 1,000 rupees ($16) to enter.

Indian visitors normally pay just 40 rupees, but will be able to buy the more expensive ticket if they want to get around the limit.

The Taj Mahal was built by Mughal emperor Shah Jahan as a tomb for his beloved wife Mumtaz Mahal, who died giving birth in 1631.

Anyone wanting to see the main crypt, which houses the couple's spectacular marble graves inlaid with semi-precious stones, will also have to pay for the pricier ticket.

The graves also date back to the 17th century but do not actually contain the bodies of the royal couple, who are buried under a separate lower chamber.

Chaotic
Visitors to the UNESCO World Heritage site already have to contend with lengthy queues and heavy security.

The plan to restrict visitors comes after five people were injured in a crush on the last day of the year, which often attracts large crowds.

"It's a welcome move because the last time we came here it was very chaotic," Seema Sarkar, a tourist from the eastern Indian state of West Bengal, told AFP.

Local tourist police inspector R.B. Pandey said it was a much needed step.

"It's priceless heritage and if we don't cap the tourist numbers it will be lost for future generations," he said.

"You just cannot control such huge crowds."

Daily visitors to the Taj Mahal average 10,000-15,000 but can be much higher at weekends, going up to around 70,000.

Nearly 6.5 million visited the monument in 2016, according to government figures.

The Taj Mahal has attracted world leaders and royalty, including former US President Bill Clinton.

Diana, the late British princess, was famously photographed alone on a marble seat there in 1992.

But the mausoleum faces an array of threats, including the yellowing effects of smog.

In 2016, green stains on its rear wall were blamed on excrement from insects.

Authorities have in the past covered the iconic monument's facade with "mud packs" made of fuller's earth, which draws out the impurities, to restore its whiteness.


© Agence France-Presse






Today's News

January 4, 2018

Ancient infant helps University of Alaska scientists unravel America's genetic history

BEUYS: Documentary portrait of Joseph Beuys to have U.S. theatrical premiere at Film Forum

Qatari-owned jewels stolen in audacious Venice heist

India limits visitors to save Taj Mahal

Carriageworks unveils monumental installation by German artist Katharina Grosse

Writers, Slovaks, scandal cast spell of 1968 Prague Spring

Auschwitz and Auschwitz II-Birkenau receive 2.1 million visitors in 2017

Albert Paley Archives, Seymour Stein Collection, 20th/21st C. design in Rago's January auctions

Fraenkel Gallery opens "Art & Vinyl: Artists & the Record Album from Picasso to the Present"

Garvey/Simon opens a group exhibition curated by Joseph A. Gross

New piece of the Moon arrives at the Natural History Museum in London

Library of Congress acquires archive of humorist, political commentator Art Buchwald

Oil on board painting by Wayne Thiebaud soars to $1.08 million at Nadeau's

"In the Land of Pasaquan: The Story of Eddie Owens Martin" on view at Intuit

Exhibition of paintings from the 1980s by Ann Purcell opens at Berry Campbell Gallery

Haines Gallery opens a solo exhibition of new work by photographer David Maisel

MIT List Visual Arts Center exhibition series features video by Adam Pendleton

John Lennon's Monkey bike for sale with H&H Classics at the National Motorcycle Museum in March

Dr. Nathaniel Silver at Gardner Museum wins I Tatti Prize for Best Essay

Mary Boone Gallery opens exhibition of paintings by Kathe Burkhart

Leigh Ruple's first exhibition with Morgan Lehman Gallery opens in New York

Times Square Arts' January Midnight Moment features FX Harsono's "Writing in the Rain"

Nancy Toomey Fine Art opens exhibition of works by Miya Ando

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Holocaust 'masterpiece' causes uproar at Venice film festival

2.- To be unveiled at Sotheby's: One of the greatest collections of Orientalist paintings ever assembled

3.- Bender Gallery features paintings by up and coming Chicago artist Michael Hedges

4.- Lévy Gorvy exhibits new and historic works by French master in his centenary year

5.- Artificial Intelligence as good as Mahler? Austrian orchestra performs symphony with twist

6.- Fascinating new exhibition explores enduring artistic bond between Scotland and Italy

7.- Exhibition explores the process of Japanese-style woodblock production

8.- Robert Frank, photographer of America's underbelly, dead at 94

9.- The truth behind the legend of patriot Paul Revere revealed in a new exhibition at New-York Historical Society

10.- Hitler bust found in cellar of French Senate



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 



Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
(1941 - 2019)
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful