The First Art Newspaper on the Net   Established in 1996 United States Monday, November 20, 2017


Hauser & Wirth opens first New York solo presentation devoted to Geta Brătescu
Geta Brătescu, Jocul Formelor (Game of Forms), 2012. Collage on paper, Series of 7. Photo: Ștefan Sava. © Geta Brătescu. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth.


NEW YORK, NY.- ‘Geta Brătescu. The Leaps of Aesop’ is the first New York solo presentation devoted to the 91 year-old forerunner in the field of Romanian Conceptualism. Her diverse oeuvre – comprising drawing, collage, engraving, textiles, and photography, as well as experimental film, video, and performance – mines themes of identity, gender, and dematerialization, often drawing from the stories of literary figures and addressing the symbiotic relationship between art making and working environments. Aesop, the ancient Greek fabulist, serves as a point of departure for this exhibition, which features more than fifty works that span Brătescu’s career. In many ways a fitting avatar for Brătescu, Aesop manifests in the works on view as a symbol of antic irreverence, mocking authority and status. A spirited believer in the role of the artist as that of a disruptor, Brătescu has championed ideas of play and disorder throughout her vibrant practice, remarking, ‘there is much economy and at the same time rebellion in the creation of expression.’

On view through 23 December 2017, ‘Geta Brătescu. The Leaps of Aesop’ is conceived in collaboration with Magda Radu, curator and art historian based in Bucharest, Romania. She curated ‘Apparitions,’ Brătescu’s exhibition for the Romanian Pavilion at La Biennale di Venezia 2017.

Magda Radu on ‘Geta Brătescu. The Leaps of Aesop’
The exhibition ‘The Leaps of Aesop’ tracks the many implications generated by Aesop, the writer of the ancient fables, who, in Geta Brătescu’s system of thinking, becomes a playful and mischievous character and can be regarded as a metaphor for the condition of the artist. Right after the fall of the Communist regime in Romania, Geta Brătescu declared Aesop a symbol of ‘everything that stood against totalitarianism.’ But Aesop, like Medea, is a sign encompassing so many overlapping meanings that his literary embodiment is transcended and endlessly modulated in the artist’s practice. Aesop is, above all, an agent of freedom, the entity responsible for sparking the creative process in the studio. His leaps are so many movements of the mind, while his undisciplined nature channels the creative energy in countless directions. Aesop is a catalyst of ideas, rejecting the barriers between genres. His characteristic irreverence constitutes the ferment that pushes the artist to experiment in a plethora of forms of expression: drawing, collage, object, printing techniques, experimental film, performance, and animation.

Regarding his literary personality, Aesop is a relative of Păcală (‘Joker’ or ‘Trickster’), a character from Romanian folktales, who could be read in a subversive key as a parable of the way the weak and marginal confront the powerful by means of humor, courage, and cunning. This thread extends to another vernacular hero of Middle Eastern popular culture, Nasreddin Hodja, a follower of Aesop, carrying the latter’s ‘last breath,’ whose tales are rendered by Geta Brătescu in whimsical visual narratives. The same spirit precipitates the conjuring of characters like Charlot or Eugène Ionesco disguised as a clown; both are referenced in her writings, adding to the rich genealogy of jesters and fools telling uncomfortable truths to power. The artist is, after all, ‘tragicomic in her Chaplinesque destiny,’ a figure that can switch and accumulate identities, a theatrical creature playfully fashioning her many personae. Sometimes the studio itself becomes a theater stage and the objects within turn into characters that acquire parts in invented scenarios.

Extending the idea of playfulness, Brătescu is fascinated by the disruptive potential of magnets, as illustrated in her landmark piece, ‘Magnets in the City’ (1974), a photomontage with an accompanying text describing the ways in which magnets of various sizes, placed outside and within the city limits, unleash their hazardous energies, generating chaos while simultaneously reminding people of their own volition and power to act. In the same vein, the final segment of film, ‘The Studio,’ stages a Dada-like revolt, in which the artist employs various surrounding objects in a madcap, ritualized performance.

A more somber extrapolation of the state of febrile agitation may be linked to the concept of disorder, made explicit in another significant work, ‘Anti-Faust,’ an installation of almost formless drawings, developed as an antithesis to the conceptual and technical rigor of the Faust series, turning the visual interpretation of a literary masterpiece into an uncanny meditation on the self. Finally, the dimension of play and unbound formal inventiveness drives Brătescu’s recent Game of Forms series: each sheet of paper is like a field of competing energies, a theatrical or dance stage, where the profusion of shapes cut out with scissors enact condensed and abstracted versions of the Aesopian plays.

A displacement of the narrative towards sheer seriality and process also appears in her Drawings with the Eyes Closed series, which often emphasize the tension between the outside world and the inner flux of the mind that exteriorizes itself through drawing. The artist once declared that she starts these drawings ‘in/with a completely negative attitude towards expression.’ But this continuum does not go on uninterrupted, unhampered by the intrusion of memory, of some ‘mental motif,’ and she is well aware of that: ‘To draw with the eyes closed means on the one hand to invite chance, and on the other, to challenge it. It is precisely this double relation to the haphazard that reinforces the playful nature of this experience.’ Geta Brătescu incorporates in her ‘automatic’ drawings the emergence of forms, as the hand strives to record what gradually comes to mind, in a movement that cannot and will not let go of its creative impetus. This process is not devoid of its moments of impasse. Her video, ‘Cocktail Automatic’ (1993), captures the anxiety of the artistic process, marked by lapses, pointless repetitions, and failed attempts at beginning something.

Geta Brătescu was born in Ploieşti, Romania, in 1926. From 1945 to 1949, she studied at the Faculty of Letters and Philosophy at the University of Bucharest under renowned Romanian literary critics, George Călinescu and Tudor Vianu, and at the Bucharest Academy of Fine Arts with painter and academic, Camil Ressu. In 1950 her studies were interrupted by the Communist government, and she was unable to complete her art education until 1971. Following her exclusion from university, Brătescu worked principally as an illustrator and graphic designer, and in the early 1960s became the artistic director of prestigious literary magazine, Secolul 20.

Brătescu is currently the subject of numerous major solo museum surveys, including: ‘Geta Brătescu – Apariţii (Geta Brătescu – Apparitions)’ at La Biennale di Venezia, Romanian Pavilion, Venice, Italy; and ‘Geta Brătescu: An atelier of one’s own’, at Museum voor Schone Kunsten Gent, Ghent, Belgium, which toured from her exhibition ‘Geta Brătescu. The Studio: A Tireless, Ongoing Space’, at Camden Arts Centre London, England. Previous major solo museum exhibitions, both international and in her native Romania, include: ‘Geta Brătescu. Restrospective’ at the Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg (2016); ‘Geta Brătescu: Drawings with the Eyes Closed’ at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, St. Louis MO (2015); ‘Geta Brătescu / MATRIX 254’ at the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley CA (2014); and ‘Geta Brătescu: The Artist’s Studios’ at the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León, León (2013). She has also been included in significant group exhibitions, such as ‘Geta Brătescu’, Documenta 14, Anthens, Greece, and Kassel, Germany; ‘Construction to Transmission: Art in Eastern Europe and Latin America, 1960 – 1980’ at the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2015); ‘Straight to Camera: Performance for Film’ at Modern Art Oxford (2014); and ‘A Bigger Splash: Painting After Performance Art’ at Tate, London (2012).






Today's News

November 15, 2017

Marc Chagall's "Les Amoureux" sets auction record at $28.5 million at Sotheby's

Hauser & Wirth opens first New York solo presentation devoted to Geta Brătescu

Olga Viso steps down as Executive Director of the Walker Art Center

Berkshire Museum seeks expedited trial

Exhibition of works on paper from 1961 through 2009 by David Hockney on view at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Getty presents J. Paul Getty Medal to Anselm Kiefer and Mario Vargas Llosa

Kröller-Müller Museum acquires work by Félix Vallotton

UAE says Swiss reporters 'stopped for questioning' after Louvre launch

University of Michigan Museum of Art reopens Asian Art Conservation Lab

Museum of Russian Icons receives major gift of more than 100 works

100 years of American Art totals $19.4 million at Sotheby's New York

Puma accused of defacing Indian heritage for shoe commercial

César Dezfuli wins tenth anniversary Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize

Museo Jumex opens first major survey of John Baldessari's work in Latin America

Group exhibition spotlights new explorations in figurative painting by four emerging artists

Phillips announces 20th Century & Contemporary Art & Design Evening Sale in Hong Kong

Hella Jongerius and Louise Schouwenberg develop an installation for the Pinakothek der Moderne

Whyte's announces highlights from its Important Irish Art auction

Belvedere opens exhibition of works by Eva Koťátková

Solo exhibition of photographs by Jonathas de Andrade on view at Alexander and Bonin

David Adamo's second solo exhibition at rodolphe janssen opens in Brussels

Exhibition at Lennon, Weinberg presents paintings by Roy Dowell and Richard Kalina

One Gray Hair: Frye Art Museum opens exhibition of works by Alison Marks

Christopher Grimes opens exhibitions of works by Miguel Rio Branco and Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle

Shapero Modern opens exhibition of paintings by Nancy Cadogan and sculptures by Martin Jennings

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Grasshopper found embedded in van Gogh masterpiece at Nelson-Atkins

2.- Scientists discover a mysterious, plane-sized 'void' in Great Pyramid in Egypt

3.- The largest collection of Viking artifacts on display in North America comes to the Royal Ontario Museum

4.- Rafael Soriano opens at Frost Art Museum FIU: Kicks off Miami's Art Basel season

5.- Cleveland Museum of Art releases new strategic plan

6.- Exhibition tells the story of the artists who fled to Britain to escape war in France

7.- Zahi Hawass criticises pyramid void 'discovery'

8.- French court to rule on Nazi-looted Pissarro painting

9.- Clark Art Institute exhibition studies less-explored aspects of Impressionist works

10.- Exhibitions in Germany and Switzerland present works from the Gurlitt Estate



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher:Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez


Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful