The First Art Newspaper on the Net   Established in 1996 United States Tuesday, February 19, 2019


Unique Roman gladiator ruins that flourished about 1,700 years ago unveiled in Austria
A virtual video presentations of the former Roman gladiator school that was found by underground radar is provided by the Ludwig Bolzmann institute for archaeology in Carnuntum, Austria, on Monday, Sept 5, 2011. They lived in cells barely big enough to turn around in for the time allotted them until death; usually four or five battles in the arena. This was the lot of those who trained at what experts described Monday as a world sensation _ the newly found and well preserved remnants of a gladiator school. AP Photo/Ronald Zak.

By: George Jahn, Associated Press


PETRONELL-CARNUNTUM (AP).- They lived in cells barely big enough to turn around in and usually fought until they died. This was the lot of those at a sensational scientific discovery unveiled Monday: The well-preserved ruins of a gladiator school in Austria.

The Carnuntum ruins are part of a city of 50,000 people 28 miles (45 kilometers) east of Vienna that flourished about 1,700 years ago, a major military and trade outpost linking the far-flung Roman empire's Asian boundaries to its central and northern European lands.

Mapped out by radar, the ruins of the gladiator school remain underground. Yet officials say the find rivals the famous Ludus Magnus — the largest of the gladiatorial training schools in Rome — in its structure. And they say the Austrian site is even more detailed than the well-known Roman ruin, down to the remains of a thick wooden post in the middle of the training area, a mock enemy that young, desperate gladiators hacked away at centuries ago.

"(This is) a world sensation, in the true meaning of the word," said Lower Austrian provincial Governor Erwin Proell.

The archaeological park Carnuntum said the ruins were "unique in the world ... in their completeness and dimension."

The gladiator complex is part of a 10-square kilometer (3.9-square mile) site over the former city, an archaeological site now visited by hundreds of thousands of tourists a year. Officials said they had no date yet for the start of excavations of the gladiator school, saying experts needed time to settle on a plan that conserves as much as possible.

"If one has a major injury then you first do a series of CT scans before you let a surgeon do his work," explained Wolfgang Neubauer, director of the Ludwig Bolzman Institute for Archaeological Prospecting and Virtual Archaeology.

Digging at the city site began around 1870, but less than one percent of it has been excavated, due to the enormity of what lies beneath and to the painstaking process of restoring what already has been unearthed.

Neubauer said an unusual and unexplained "white spot" on an aerial photograph led experts to scan the area with state-of-the-art radar that shows a three-dimensional image of what lies underground.

"(It's) a clarity we normally find only in the field of medicine," he said Monday. The same machines have been used at Britain's Stonehenge and other European archaeological sites.

A virtual video presentation of the former Carnuntum gladiator school showed images of the ruins underground shifting into what the complex must have looked like in the third century.

It was definitely a school of hard knocks.

"A gladiator school was a mixture of a barracks and a prison, kind of a high-security facility," said the Roemisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum, one of the institutes involved in finding and evaluating the discovery. "The fighters were often convicted criminals, prisoners-of-war, and usually slaves."

Still, there were some perks for the men who sweated and bled for what they hoped would at least be a few brief moments of glory before their demise.

At the end of a dusty and bruising day, they could pamper their bodies in baths with hot, cold and lukewarm water. And hearty meals of meat, grains and cereals were plentiful for the men who burned thousands of calories in battle each day for the entertainment of others.

Thick walls surround 11,000 square meters (13,160 sq. yards) of the site, and the school and its adjacent buildings stretch over 2,800 square meters ((3,350 square yards).

Inside, a courtyard was ringed by living quarters and other buildings and contained a round, 19-square meter (23-square yard) training area — a small stadium overlooked by wooden seats and the terrace of the chief trainer.

The complex also contained about 40 tiny sleeping cells for the gladiators; a large bathing area; a training hall with heated floors and assorted administrative buildings. Outside the walls, radar scans show what archeologists believe was a cemetery for those killed during training.

The institute said the training area was where the men's "market value and in end effect their fate" was decided. At the same time, it gave them a small chance for survival, fame, and possibly liberty.

"If they were successful, they had a chance to advance to 'superstar' status — and maybe even achieve freedom," said Carnuntum park head Franz Humer.

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press.





Today's News

September 6, 2011

Raphael, Dürer and Grünewald paint the Madonna at Gemaldegalerie Alte Meister in Dresden

Stadel Museum discovers an important work by French academic painter Jean-Léon Gérome

Unique Roman gladiator ruins that flourished about 1,700 years ago unveiled in Austria

Thomas Gainsborough Linley portraits reunited at Dulwich Picture Gallery

Sotheby's Islamic World arts sale to feature exceptional ceramics from the Collection of Harvey B. Plotnick

Bonhams offers two masterpieces by celebrated Russian painter Vasili Polenov, unseen for 80 years

Sotheby's London to offer two landmark portraits by Johann Zoffany of the celebrated actor David Garrick

Italian cops nab alleged vandal of famous fountain; "exemplary punishment" requested by Mayor

Israel's ancient rebel caves, a hidden adventure published in an obscure journal

Film "Shame" directed by British video artist Steve McQueen brings sex addiction tale to Venice

Crazy Horse sculptor's 85-year-old widow, Ruth Ziolkowski, carries on mountain dream

1775 public notice known as a "broadside": Colonists asked pacifists to pay

Governor-General's railway carriage on show for the first time at the Powerhouse Museum

Matthew Monahan, Untitled at Galerie Fons Welters

Mat Collishaw to feature "Bullet Hole" at the 12th Istanbul Biennial

Sotheby's Hong Kong to hold magnificent jewels and jadeite autumn sale in October

Bonhams to sell Aston Martin owned by Shane Filan of Irish pop group Westlife

Martin Luther King Memorial architect says inscription will stay

Two arrested in Portugal after rhino horn heist

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Underground in Jerusalem, a rare look at an ancient tomb

2.- Research reveals new species are evolving fastest in Antarctica

3.- Tate Modern opens the UK's first major Pierre Bonnard exhibition in 20 years

4.- Travel ban for 'fragile' Van Gogh's 'Sunflowers'

5.- Holocaust museum stokes controversy among Hungary's Jews

6.- Rare Hassam, Jefferson letter and Sèvres porcelain offered at Potomack Auction

7.- 'Discriminating Thieves: Nazi-Looted Art and Restitution' opens at Nelson-Atkins

8.- Andy Goldsworthy to create Walking Wall on Nelson-Atkins campus

9.- US university to cover Christopher Columbus murals

10.- Leonardo da Vinci's drawings go under the microscope in a new publication



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher:Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez


Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful