The First Art Newspaper on the Net   Established in 1996 United States Sunday, November 29, 2015

United States Decision to Attend Hiroshima Memorial Hailed
A woman photographs bundles of chained paper cranes at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western Japan, Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2010. Hiroshima marks the 65th anniversary of the world's first atomic bomb attack on Aug. 6. AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama.

By: Eric Talmadge, Associated Press Writer

HIROSHIMA (AP).- The site of the world's first atomic attack swarmed with tens of thousands of people Thursday as Hiroshima prepared for a memorial that will for the first time have representatives from the United States and other major nuclear powers.

Washington's decision to attend the 65th anniversary event on Friday has been welcomed by Japan's government, but has generated complex feelings among some Japanese who see the bombing as unjustified and want the United States to apologize.

"Americans think that the bombing was reasonable because it speeded up the end of the war. They try to see it in a positive way," Naomi Sawa, a 69-year-old former teacher, said after paying her respects to the dead. "But we were devastated."

About 140,000 people were killed or died within months when an American B-29 bombed Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945. Three days later, about 80,000 people died after the United States attacked Nagasaki.

Japan surrendered on Aug. 15, ending World War II.

Concerns that attending the ceremony — an emotional event beginning with the offering of water to the dead and the ringing of a bell to soothe their souls — would reopen old wounds had until this year kept the U.S. away.

Former President Jimmy Carter visited Hiroshima's Peace Museum in 1984, after he was out of office. The highest-ranking American to visit while in office is House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who went in 2008.

Neither went for the annual memorial.

But to gain wider attendance, Hiroshima has taken great pains to ensure that the memorial will be a forward-looking event, a key to getting Washington to participate. Japanese officials said it is important to use the anniversary as a chance to push nuclear disarmament, not revisit history.

That message appears to have resonated.

Friday's memorial is to be the largest gathering yet, with representatives from 75 countries and United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. John Roos, the ambassador to Japan, will represent the U.S.

French and British dignitaries were to join for the first time as well.

The presence of the U.S. has been hailed by officials in Hiroshima and Tokyo as a breakthrough and a sign of President Barack Obama's desire to push ahead with his ambitious goal of creating a world without nuclear weapons.

"We believe the attendance of the nuclear powers will bolster a global desire to abolish nuclear weapons," Hiroshima Mayor Tadatoshi Akiba said in a statement.

Ban, who visited Nagasaki on Thursday before arriving in Hiroshima, said this year's memorial will send a strong signal to the world that nuclear weapons must be destroyed.

"The only way to ensure that such weapons will never again be used is to eliminate them all," he said. "There must be no place in our world for such indiscriminate weapons."

Hiroshima has invited Obama to visit the city, and he has expressed interest in doing so at some point while he is in office.

But such a visit would be highly controversial.

At Hiroshima's Peace Memorial Park, some visitors expressed concerns that Japan's view of the bombing — seen by many as excessive use of deadly force — still remains at odds with America's.

Katsuko Nishibe, a 61-year-old peace activist, said she welcomed the decision to send Roos, but added that she thought it was dangerous to think that the bombing of Hiroshima was justified.

"I don't think it was necessary," she said. "We have a very different interpretation of history. But we can disagree about history and still agree that peace is what is important. That is the real lesson of Hiroshima."

Jerry Wohlgemuth, a 23-year-old college student from Great Meadows, New Jersey, said he supported the decision to send a representative from the U.S.

"It shows how much progress we've made as a country," he said.

But he said he thought the bombing was unavoidable.

"Just imagining sending Marines to Japan's mainland and having to take Tokyo — millions would have died. It might not have even been possible. World War II was total war."

Copyright 2010 The Associated Press.

Hiroshima Memorial | World War II | United States |

Today's News

August 6, 2010

Diaghilev and the Golden Age of the Ballets Russes 1909-1929 to Open at the V&A

MFA Houston Commissions Artist Cai Guo-Qiang to Create Gunpowder Drawing

Cambodia to Restore 'Killing Fields' Skull-Filled Memorial

Bertoia Auctions to Sell European Toy Vehicles from K-B Toys Co-Founder Collection

Whitney Announces First Major U.S. Retrospective of the Work of Paul Thek

BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art Announces a Major Exhibition of the Work of Anselm Kiefer

Now Reopened, Israel Museum has New Look at History of Holy Land

Tate Liverpool Announces First Major Retrospective of Nam June Paik

Sotheby's Q2 Beats Wall Street on Strong Auction Sales

Guggenheim Announces "Art in France, Italy, and Germany, 1918-1936

Exhibition of Italian Prints from Mantegna to Piranesi to Open in Adelaide

Iconic Swiss Painter Albert Anker Gets Big Centenary Show

John W. Coker Announces Sale of Impressionist Treasures

Frank Gehry's Santa Monica Place Mall Deconstructed in a Green Renovation

Tabaimo to Represent Japan at the Biennale di Venezia 2011

Everson Museum Presents the Work of Gerald DiGiusto

Field Museum Scholars Find that Oxygen Fuels the Fires of Time

Three Solo Exhibitions Open at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art

Cartier-Bresson Exhibit Tells Stories in Decisive Moments

19th Century Topographical Artists Star at Bonhams Sale

King Tutankhamun's Chariot Now on View at New York Exhibition

United States Decision to Attend Hiroshima Memorial Hailed

The Anti Design Festival: Anarchy, Art and Design to Hit the Streets of London

The New School Presents Amplify: Creative and Sustainable Lifestyles in the Lower East Side

Bali Declaration Hopes to Save Indonesia's Biodiversity from Deforestation

Most Popular Last Seven Days

1.- First solo exhibition by the American artist Mickalene Thomas in Belgium opens at Galerie Nathalie Obadia

2.- Israel accidentally finds ancient mosaic that served as pavement for a courtyard in a villa

3.- The address of Johannes Vermeer's the Little Street discovered by Rijksmuseum curator

4.- The nine lives of Russia's Hermitage cats that root out unwanted guests: Rodents

5.- Robbers make off with masterpieces by Rubens and Tintoretto from museum in Verona

6.- 17th century letters at Museum of Communication reveal refugees 'sense of loss'

7.- New museum dedicated to the artist Mu Xin opens in Zhejiang Province, China

8.- Who are the most prolific art collectors in the US today?

9.- Rubens House brings newly discovered study for a portrait by Van Dyck to Antwerp

10.- "The Nude in the XX and XXI century" curated by Jane Neal opens at Sotheby's S/2 London

Related Stories

United States to Send First Delegation to Hiroshima Memorial

Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .


Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher:Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez
Social Network Manager and Translator: Norma Cristina Pérez Ayala Cano

Royalville Communications, Inc
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
to a Mexican poet.

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful