The First Art Newspaper on the Net Established in 1996 United States Saturday, December 20, 2014


Art in Hamburg in the 1920s Opens at Hamburger Kunsthalle
Karl Kluth (1898-1972), Küste in Nordschleswig, 1931. Öl auf Leinwand, 75 x 100 cm © Nachlass Karl Kluth © Hamburger Kunsthalle / bpk. Photo: Elke Walford.
HAMBURG.- As part of the festival “Himmel auf Zeit” – die 20er Jahre in Hamburg (“A Temporary Heaven” – the 1920s in Hamburg), the Hamburger Kunsthalle is highlighting the diversity of the city’s art scene in the period after the First World War. In the years between the foundation of the Weimar Republic and the establishment of the Nazi dictatorship, Hamburg’s avant-garde art scene was dominated by four different movements: one was a style strongly oriented towards contemporary French painting, while another reflected emerging expressionist tendencies; this in turn gave way to Magic Realism and – from the second half of the 1920s onwards – there was also a distinct move from objective depiction towards abstract pictorial forms.

Hamburg artists like Friedrich Ahlers-Hestermann, Alma del Banco and Gretchen Wohlwill, as well as the now lesser-known painters Fritz Friedrichs and Walther Tanck, took their inspiration from their French counterparts. Many went to work and study in Paris after acquiring the fundamental artistic skills at home. While they were particularly fascinated by Paul Cézanne’s use of brushstrokes to break down the subject matter and create an interwoven perspective, the influence of Renoir, Matisse and Cubist methods can also be discerned in their art. The “cultivated balance” (Gustav Pauli) of their works brought these artists widespread recognition from 1919 until they were condemned by the Nazis.

By contrast, the development of expressionist tendencies among the Hamburg avant-garde lasted only a few years. It emerged in reaction to the trauma of the First World War and was reflected in the art of Emil Maetzel and his wife Dorothea Maetzel-Johannsen, the canvases of the painter and interior designer Otto Fischer-Trachau and the works of the painter and sculptor Heinrich Steinhagen, as well as in the many woodcut prints created by Hamburg’s avant-garde and published in expressionist magazines such as “DIE ROTE ERDE”. Thanks to the efforts of patrons and collectors such as Gustav Schiefler and Rosa Schapire, artists in Hamburg became familiar with and were particularly influenced by the art of the Dresden-based “Brücke” group.

The emergence of Neue Sachlichkeit (New Objectivity) in Hamburg formed a curious contrast to the rest of the country: whereas in other cities this movement flourished in the period up to around 1925/26, here there was no charismatic figure to lead the movement or steer it in a particular direction. Anita Rée, Heinrich Stegemann, Otto Rodewald and the Altona-based artist Edgar Ende worked quite independently of one another, although their pictorial creations all point in the direction of Magic Realism – an apolitical, highly symbolic variant of New Objectivity that was often characterised by irrational elements.

Nor was there a great deal of collaboration between those artists in Hamburg who moved into abstraction. Among others, Richard Haizmann, Alfred Ehrhardt and Willi Nass developed individual ways of distancing themselves from the object – by embracing spiritual and philosophical notions, for example, or drawing inspiration from music. On the other hand, the close collaboration of artists in the “Hamburg Secession” resulted in the development of the so-called “Secession style”. This was also a positive side effect of working together in a studio complex that had been placed at the artists’ disposal in the wake of the world economic crisis.

The exhibition presents paintings and a selection of sculptures that also reveal the relationship between art and architecture in the 1920s, as well as works on paper.

Hamburger Kunsthalle | Friedrich Ahlers-Hestermann | Alma del Banco | Gretchen Wohlwill |




Today's News

March 28, 2010

Picasso's Themes and Variations Offers Unique View into Artist's Creative Process

Suite of 127 Silkscreen Plates by Josef Albers on View at Peter Blum

Wager Begun on Twitter Results in NOMA Winning a Masterpiece from Indianapolis

Asia Week Sales Total $22.6 Million at Sotheby's New York

Spanish Ministry of Culture Organizes Meeting of Photography Collectives

The Royal Collection of Graphic Art Photographs on View in Copenhagen

Art in Hamburg in the 1920s Opens at Hamburger Kunsthalle

Mural Paintings at Castillo de Chapultepec Now on the Web

"Alice Neel: Painted Truths Debuts" at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Exhibitions by Maria Friberg and Dean Kessmann at Conner Contemporary

Sackler Gallery Presents Contemporary Chinese Artist Hai Bo

Staatliche Kunsthalle Baden-Baden Opens Exhibition of Works by Stefan Müller

Artium Presents the Exhibition "Desde Ayacata", by Juan Hidalgo

Peabody Essex Museum Opens Maya Exhibition

Large Model of H.M.S. Leviathan to be Sold in Aid of Rotherham Sea Cadet Corps in Maritime Sale

Joan Jonas's Reading Dante III at Yvon Lambert New York

New Series of Paintings by Ilya and Emilia Kabakov at Sprovieri Gallery

"Linus Bill: The Greatest Hits Vol. 1" on View at Foam in Amsterdam

London Original Print Fair Announces Highlights and Exhibitor List

Cool(e)motion Spotlights Climate Change in a Unique Way

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Colossal statue of Amenhotep III unveiled on the west bank of the Nile in Egypt

2.- British royals crown New York visit with gala dinner

3.- Missing artwork rediscovered in "Stuart Little" sells for over 200,000 euros at auction

4.- Rossetti's Venus Verticordia soars at Sotheby's in London to sell for £2.88 million

5.- Russian magnate buys, then returns Nobel prize to American geneticist James Watson

6.- Egyptian Museum unveils four newly renovated halls of the famed Tutankhamun gallery

7.- 'The Secret of Dresden: From Rembrandt to Canaletto' on view at the Groninger Museum

8.- Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum reopens after three-year renovation

9.- More than 200 queries about works by possible heirs received on Nazi-era art hoard

10.- Attorney, artist and filmmaker reflects on the seven lessons learned at 2014 Art Basel Miami Beach

Related Stories



Hamburger Kunsthalle Opens First Major Philipp Otto Runge Retrospective in Thirty Years

Spectacular Marine Paintings from the Dutch Golden Age on View at Hamburger Kunsthalle

Baloise Art Prize Winner Geert Goiris in the Hamburger Kunsthalle

Survey of Stephan von Huene's Work on View at Hamburger Kunsthalle

"The Jesus Scandal: A Liebermann Painting in the Crossfire of Critics"

Tate Modern's Pop Life to Travel to Hamburger Kunsthalle in February

Hamburger Kunsthalle Celebrates Horst Janssen's 80th Anniversary

Views of Hamburg: The City in the Painter's Gaze at Hamburger Kunsthalle

The Arena of Ridicule: English Caricatures 1780-1830 Opens at Hamburger Kunsthalle

Hamburger Kunsthalle Presents Marcel van Eeden: The Zurich Trial, Part 1: Witness for the Prosecution



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez - Marketing: Carla Gutiérrez
Special Contributor: Liz Gangemi - Special Advisor: Carlos Amador
Contributing Editor: Carolina Farias

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org theavemaria.org juncodelavega.org facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site