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Famed Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond Makes First Public Appearance in 50 Years
This undated handout photo provided by the Smithsonian Institution shows The 31.06-carat "Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond" which will join the 45.52-carat "Hope Diamond" at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History on Jan. 28, the museum announced Monday, Dec. 14, 2009. AP Photo/Smithsonian Institution.
WASHINGTON, DC.- One of the world’s most extraordinary gemstones, the "Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond", will be on display at the National Museum of Natural History Jan. 28, 2010, through Aug. 1, 2010. This will be the first time it has been available to the public in more than 50 years. A diamond of rare deep-blue color and weighing 31.06 carats, the "Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond" will be presented in the "National Gem Collection" in the Hall of Geology, Gems and Minerals, where the renowned Hope Diamond is on permanent view. The "Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond" has long been rumored to have originated from the same diamond mine in India as the Hope Diamond. Smithsonian scientists will explore this mystery while the diamond is in their care.

“The "Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond" is an object of intrigue and legend, certainly one of the great gemstones of the world,” said Jeffrey Post, curator of the National Gem Collection. “We are thrilled to present this icon of history—and gemology—to the public for the first time since it was displayed at the Brussels World’s Fair in 1958.”

The Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond has an illustrious history, dating back to 1664 when it was given by Philip IV of Spain to his daughter, the Infanta Margarita Teresa, upon her engagement to Emperor Leopold I of Austria. (In 1722, the diamond passed to the Wittelsbachs, members of the ruling House of Bavaria. It was here that the diamond derived its name.) After World War I, Bavaria became a republic and the crown jewels of the House of Wittelsbach were eventually sold at Christie’s in 1931 by auction.

In an incident that has never fully been explained, the "Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond" disappeared before the auction and was replaced by a worthless piece of blue, cut glass. The actual "Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond" resurfaced in Belgium in 1951 and was eventually displayed—without attribution—at the “World Exhibition” in Brussels in 1958. The diamond was correctly identified in 1962 by Joseph Komkommer, a Belgian gem expert.

In December 2008, the 35.56-carat stone was acquired by Laurence Graff, at auction in London. Graff’s expertise in gemology enabled him to see the potential in repolishing the stone, bringing to it more life and color while at the same time making it internally flawless. The process brought the stone to its current weight of 31.06 carats. Throughout the very delicate process of repolishing this famous stone, great care and attention was taken to retain its original features. Since then, it has achieved the top certification of internally flawless, type Ilb (the rarest), deep-blue. According to the Gemological Institute of America, the diamond “… is the largest Flawless or Internally flawless, Fancy Deep Blue, Natural Color we have graded to date…”

“To have two of the world’s most historical stones—the "Wittelsbach-Graff" and the "Hope Diamond"—displayed together, is a testament to the stones’ history and importance,” said Graff, chairman of Graff Diamonds International Ltd. “I believe the diamond’s appearance at the Smithsonian will represent another significant chapter in its remarkable history.”

As a rare blue diamond from the 17th-century, the "Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond’s" properties suggest a possible link to the same mines in India that produced the 45.52-carat "Hope Diamond", which is recognized as the most near-perfect example of a blue diamond in existence. “During the "Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond’s" residence at the museum, special tests will be conducted by our research team in the Smithsonian’s state-of-the-art laboratories to determine whether these two gemstones share a provenance,” said Post. “Whether or not the Hope Diamond and the Wittelsbach-Graff Diamonds are related, the most important thing for our visitors is that they will have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to view the two most extraordinary blue diamonds in the world.”

National Museum of Natural History | Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond | Jeffrey Post | National Gem Collection |


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