The First Art Newspaper on the Net Established in 1996 United States Tuesday, September 2, 2014


Dutchman launches life-sized replica of Noah's Ark
Interior view of the full scale replica of Noah’s Ark with life-size replica's of animals which has opened its doors in Dordrecht, Netherlands, after receiving permission to receive up to 3,000 visitors per day. Interpreting the description given in Genesis, Johan’s incredibly detailed interpretation measures in at a massive 130 meters (427 feet) long, 29 meters (95 feet) across and 23 meters (75 feet) high. For those who don’t know or remember the Biblical story, God ordered Noah to build a boat massive enough to save animals and humanity while God destroyed the rest of the earth in an enormous flood. AP Photo/Peter Dejong.

By: Toby Sterling, Associated Press

DORDRECHT (AP).- Just as the first storms of winter roll in, Dutchman Johan Huibers has finished his 20-year quest to build a full-scale, functioning model of Noah's Ark — an undertaking of, well, biblical proportions.

Huibers, a Christian, used books 6-9 of Genesis as his inspiration, following the instructions God gives Noah down to the last cubit.

Translating to modern measurements, Huibers came up with a vessel that works out to a whopping 427 feet (130 meters) long, 95 feet (29 meters) across and 75 feet (23 meters) high. Perhaps not big enough to fit every species on Earth, two by two, as described in the Bible, but plenty of space, for instance, for a pair elephants to dance a tango.

Johan's Ark towers across the flat Dutch landscape and is easily visible from a nearby highway where it lies moored in the city of Dordrecht, just south of Rotterdam.

Gazing across the ark's main hold, a huge space of stalls supported by a forest of pine trees, visitors gaze upon an array of stuffed and plastic animals, such as buffalo, zebra, gorillas, lions, tigers, bears, you name it. Elsewhere on the ark is a petting zoo with actual live animals that are less dangerous or easier to care for — such as ponies, dogs, sheep, and rabbits — and an impressive aviary of exotic birds.

"This boat — it's amazing," said Alfred Jongile, visiting from South Africa with his Dutch wife.

For Huibers, a builder by trade, it all began with a nightmare he had in 1992, when the low-lying Netherlands was flooded, as it has been many times throughout its history.

Huibers thinks that new floods are possible, not least due to global warming. He cites a New Testament passage prophesying that "the cities of the coast shall tremble" near the end of times.

But he's not worried the whole Earth will ever be flooded again. In the Bible, the rainbow is God's promise it won't be.

"I had a call from American television," he says, laughing. "This has nothing to do with the end of the Mayan calendar," he said.

He said his motivation is ultimately religious, though. He wants to make people think what their purpose is on Earth.

"I want to make people question that so that they go looking for answers," and ultimately find salvation through God and eternal life, he said.

Johan's Ark also contains a restaurant on the topmost level and a movie theater capable of seating 50 people. Around the edges of each level of the craft are displays on ancient Middle Eastern history and dress, scenes from the life of Noah, and games for kids, including water pumps and a system of levers to lift bales of hay.

Down below there is a honeycomb system of hatches, each opening into an area where food could be sealed in for long-term storage.

There is an outdoor space near the stern with a dizzying series of stairwells. Walking around, Johan points out features such as the curvature of the upper deck, which he said would have been used to collect rainwater for drinking, as well as for letting animals such as horses out to exercise where they could run around.

Another visitor, Martin Konijn, said he was impressed with the level of detail.

"You might know the story of Noah, okay, but if you see this you begin to get an idea of how it would actually have worked in practice."

Huibers says he's considering where to take the floating attraction next, including European ports or even across the Atlantic — though the latter would require transport aboard an even bigger ship.

But Huibers is also working on a new dream, perhaps even more unlikely than the first one: he wants to get Israelis and Arabs to cooperate and build a water pipeline from the Mediterranean Sea to the Dead Sea.

"If you have faith, anything is possible," he says.


Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.

Johan Huibers | Noah's Ark | Dordrecht |


Today's News

December 18, 2012

Moscow Design Museum opens with an exhibition of Soviet post-war design

Louvre boss Henri Loyrette to step down at the end of his current term of office

Exhibition offers unique chance to see one of Picasso's masterworks in an intimate setting

National Portrait Gallery in London buys artist Craigie Aitchison's own slashed self-portrait

Gail Albert Halaban reimagines famous watercolors by Edward Hopper in exhibition at Edwynn Houk Gallery

French actress wins case against mother French-Romanian photographer Irina Ionesco's explicit photos

Art dealer Dorsey Waxter appointed President of the Art Dealers Association of America

Works by Siobhan Hapaska & Stephen McKenna combined in new exhibition at Kerlin Gallery

The Whitney Museum of American Art celebrates the topping out of its future home

Bryan Adams 'Exposed' embarks on tour, Goss-Michael Foundation in Dallas is first stop

New book shows uninterrupted series of photographs of North Korea's former leader looking at things

Rescued from a tag sale, Garrard centerpiece brings $32,500 at Heritage Auctions

Swedish Transport Agency says artist Fredrik Saeker can use painting as driving licence pic

Art on the Underground collaborate with BFI to present films from the National Archive at Canary Wharf

Definitional Disruptions with Nel Aerts, Filip Gilissen and Hedwig Houben at Kunstraum

'Styling an American Family' features 1910s fashion at the Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms

The inaugural Ian Potter Moving Image Commission awarded to Angelica Mesiti

Contested Chinese seal auctioned in Paris for 1.1 mln euros

Dutchman launches life-sized replica of Noah's Ark

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Neanderthals and humans were both living in Europe for between 2,600 and 5,400 years

2.- First major exhibition to explore the historical legacy of African cultural astronomy opens at LACMA

3.- Carlo Mollino's idealized vision of the female form in new book published by Damiani/Crump

4.- Tate Britain displays works by Frank Auerbach from the collection of Lucian Freud

5.- In grave robber territory, locals abuzz over Alexander-era tomb; Largest of its kind ever discovered in Greece

6.- Lambert Collection opens an ambitious project housed at the Sainte-Anne Prison

7.- Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore announces the first 18 artists in the CCA Residencies progamme

8.- Historic Kings Theatre is transformed into major New York Performing Arts venue

9.- Thirteen's American Masters Series co-produces new documentary about photographer Dorothea Lange

10.- Sotheby's New York to offer 548 Edward Weston photographs as a single lot this September



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez - Marketing: Carla Gutiérrez
Special Contributor: Liz Gangemi - Special Advisor: Carlos Amador
Contributing Editor: Carolina Farias

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org theavemaria.org juncodelavega.org facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site