The First Art Newspaper on the Net Established in 1996 United States Saturday, December 20, 2014


Rare well was discovered in Israel, one of the first revealed dating to the Stone Age
skeletal remains that were found inside a well that was discovered in the Jezreel Valley in the northern Galilee region. Israeli archaeologists have uncovered a well dating back to the Neolithic period some 8,500 years ago, Israel's Antiquities Authority said, adding that two skeletal remains were found inside along with a variety of artifacts. Archaeologists said it was unclear how the pair came to be in the well, but hailed the discovery of the ancient water source. AFP PHOTO / ISRAEL ANTIQUITIES AUTHORITY.
JERUSALEM.- A rare well dating to the Neolithic period was uncovered in recent excavations the Israel Antiquities Authority carried out at ‘Enot Nisanit’, along the western fringes of the Jezreel Valley prior to enlarging Ha-Yogev Junction (Highway 66) by the National Roads Company. Archaeologists estimate the well was built approximately 8,500 years ago.

During the excavations the skeletal remains of a woman approximately 19 years of age and a man older than her were uncovered deep inside the well. How did these come to be in the well? Was this an accident or perhaps murder? As of now the answer to this question remains a mystery.

According to Yotam Tepper, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, “What is clear is that after these unknown individuals fell into the well it was no longer used for the simple reason that the well water was contaminated and was no longer potable”. Tepper adds, “The impressive well that was revealed was connected to an ancient farming settlement and it seems the inhabitants used it for their subsistence and living. The upper part of the well was built of stones and its lower part was hewn in the bedrock. Two capstones, which narrowed the opening, were set in place at the top of the well. It is c. 8 meters deep and its upper part measures about 1.3 meters in diameter”. Tepper says, “Numerous artifacts indicating the identity of the people who quarried it – the first farmers of the Jezreel Valley – were recovered from inside the well. The finds include, among other things, deeply denticulated sickle blades knapped from flint which were used for harvesting, as well as arrow heads and stone implements. The excavation of the accumulations in the well shaft yielded animal bones, organic finds and charcoal which will enable future studies about the domestication of plants and animals, and also allow researchers to determine the exact age of the well by means of advanced methods of absolute dating”.

“The well that was exposed in the Jezreel Valley reflects the impressive quarrying ability of the site’s ancient inhabitants and the extensive knowledge they possessed regarding the local hydrology and geology which enabled them to quarry the limestone bedrock down to the level of the water table. No doubt the quarrying of the well was a community effort that lasted a long time”, said Tepper.

According to Dr. Omri Barzilai, head of the Prehistory Branch of the Israel Antiquities Authority, “Wells from this period are unique finds in the archaeology of Israel, and probably also in the prehistoric world in general. The two oldest wells in the world were previously exposed in Cyprus and they indicated the beginning of the domestication phenomenon: it seems that ancient man tried to devise ways of protecting his drinking water from potential contamination by the animals he raised, and therefore he enclosed the water in places that were not accessible to them. The wells had another important advantage: quarrying them provided access to an available source of water that was not dependent upon springs or streams. Another well, which is about 1,000 years later than those in Cyprus, was previously exposed at the Atlit Yam site in Israel, and another well from this period has now been exposed at the ‘Enot Nisanit’ site. The exposure of these wells makes an important contribution to the study of man’s culture and economy in a period when pottery vessels and metallic objects had still not yet been invented”.

The Israel Antiquities Authority and National Roads Company will act to conserve the well and exhibit it as part of the sites around Tel Megiddo in the different periods.





Today's News

November 9, 2012

Pablo Picasso's "Nature morte aux tulipes" sells for $41.5 million at Sotheby's in New York

Rare well was discovered in Israel, one of the first revealed dating to the Stone Age

Wassily Kandinsky's Studie fr Improvisation 8 sets a world auction record for the artist

Sotheby's Autumn Auction of American Art to be held on 29 November 2012 in New York

Dante Gabriel Rossetti's The Bower Garden to be offered at Sotheby's London British and Irish Art Sale

Bonhams auction of African, Oceanic and Pre-Columbian art features rare discoveries unseen for decades

Fritz Winter's paintings juxtaposed with Lszl Moholy-Nagy's photograms in new exhibition

Israel president Shimon Peres opens new Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre in Moscow

Parisian, identified as Sofiane B., probed for selling fakes of 'Indian Picasso'

Turkish-Italian archaeological team explores site in the city of Karkemish on Syria-Turkey border

Meet Xenoceratops: Journal of Earth Sciences announces Canada's newest plant-eating horned dinosaur

Century of press photos from the International Herald Tribune newspaper goes up for auction

David Zwirner re-opens Chelsea gallery space with exhibition by artist Diana Thater

Cash-strapped UK officials sell Henry Moore statue

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts announces acquisitions made during September

Exhibition of new paintings by New York-based artist Sean Landers opens at Galerie Rodolphe Janssen

Contents of the Scottish home of the Premier Baron of England for sale at Bonhams

Contents of Killochan Castle, Ayrshire, sell at Bonhams for £364,000

The Hayward Gallery presents major exhibition of Chinese installation and performance art

Archaeologists discover Thracian golden jewelry

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Colossal statue of Amenhotep III unveiled on the west bank of the Nile in Egypt

2.- British royals crown New York visit with gala dinner

3.- Missing artwork rediscovered in "Stuart Little" sells for over 200,000 euros at auction

4.- Rossetti's Venus Verticordia soars at Sotheby's in London to sell for £2.88 million

5.- Russian magnate buys, then returns Nobel prize to American geneticist James Watson

6.- Egyptian Museum unveils four newly renovated halls of the famed Tutankhamun gallery

7.- 'The Secret of Dresden: From Rembrandt to Canaletto' on view at the Groninger Museum

8.- Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum reopens after three-year renovation

9.- More than 200 queries about works by possible heirs received on Nazi-era art hoard

10.- Attorney, artist and filmmaker reflects on the seven lessons learned at 2014 Art Basel Miami Beach



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez - Marketing: Carla Gutiérrez
Special Contributor: Liz Gangemi - Special Advisor: Carlos Amador
Contributing Editor: Carolina Farias

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org theavemaria.org juncodelavega.org facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site