The First Art Newspaper on the Net Established in 1996 United States Tuesday, March 3, 2015


"Beryl Korot: Selected Video Works: 1977 to Present" on view at bitforms gallery
Yellow Water Taxi, 2003. Single channel video, 2 min, stereo sound, 28" flat screen monitor, 15.75 x 25.75" / 40 x 65.4 cm., display dimensions variable, edition of 12.
NEW YORK, NY.- bitforms gallery presents its first solo exhibition with artist Beryl Korot. Featuring her landmark video installation “Text and Commentary” (1977), the show also includes two of Korot’s more recent investigations into the medium, “Florence” (2008) and “Yellow Water Taxi” (2003).

Recognized since the early 1970s as a pioneer of video art and of multiple channel work in particular, Beryl Korot explores the physical mark of human history and the programmatic structures of data that convey it. The rhythmic impulse in her compositions embraces text, weaving, and video.

“The thing that attracted me to the loom was its sophistication as a programming tool— it programs patterns through the placement of threads, in a numerical order that determines pattern possibilities,” said Korot to Grace Glueck in a 1977 New York Times article. “It’s like the first computer on earth.”

An active player in New York’s then emergent video art scene, Korot had, by 1977, been featured in exhibitions at The Kitchen, the Leo Castelli Gallery, Everson Museum of Art, the Whitney Biennale, Documenta 6, and several important traveling shows: Circuit Invitational, Radical Software, and ICI’s Video Art USA in the Sao Paulo Biennial. Korot’s first multiple-channel works, “Text and Commentary” and “Dachau 1974”, are groundbreaking efforts that moved the video medium beyond the television’s frame and into a vocabulary of installation, both of which were featured at the Whitney Museum of Art in 1980.

When “Text and Commentary” debuted in 1977 at the Leo Castelli Gallery, Jeff Perrone of Artforum described the installation’s systematic approach: “Process was reduced to a small set of actions repeated in space (repeated diamond designs in each hanging, and on each screen) and time (repeated in the work in the loom and repeated on the tape). The patterns in drawing, in making, in editing, in form and design—all converged little by little, after close scrutiny, creating a unified work which reflected a larger reach of human time— from primitive loom to modern video”.

The installation is illuminated by two scores, also on view in the exhibition. Instructions for Korot’s five-channel weavings are marked on graph paper in pencil. A pictographic notation indicates the rhythm and pacing of her video editing, which was recorded and edited on ½” reel to reel tape.

As with many artist’s videos of the 1970s, “Text and Commentary” is a reaction against television. The threedimensional form of a cathode ray monitor, its dials and buttons, are intentionally masked by a recessed wall. The piece also takes a radical approach to time, running 30 minutes in length, and challenges the authority of a single-channel linear narrative. It expands the video frame into a multiple-channel viewpoint. By banding a horizontal strip of video screens together, the visual structure references celluloid film (which was typically cut by women who were film editors, another reference to handiwork such as weaving).

“Florence”, a more recent single-channel video by Korot, is organized by a black and white grid comprised of waterfalls, boiling water and snowstorms. Taking the form of a soliloquy or poem, the ten-minute piece abstracts various texts by Florence Nightingale and unfolds linearly as a meditation on the transcendence of fear– not in a momentary instinctual way, but over a sustained period of time. It is concrete poetry, using other people’s words, with each word floating vertically down the screen with its own position, transparency and speed.

“Yellow Water Taxi” presents the viewer with a colorful scene of movement, bound by a woven grid underlying its electronic image. Korot remarks in a recent catalog about the work: "A morning walk to the Esplanade, near where the Towers had been– just to watch and record water taxis ferrying people between New Jersey and New York City– then riding across a piece of handmade canvas scanned into the computer."





Today's News

March 31, 2012

Paul and Lulu Hilliard University Art Museum plays April Fools' joke on prolific forger

Christie's New York to offer the most important collection of Abstract Expressionism

Graffiti artist Banksy £400,000 triumphs as seventeen art works sell at Bonhams Urban Art Sale

Ernest Hemingway shows soft side in newly public letters at the Kennedy presidential library

Sotheby's to launch its new state-of-the art Hong Kong Gallery space on 19 May 2012

1823 William Stone printing of The Declaration of Independence could bring $250,000+ at Heritage Auctions

Titanic: The artifact exhibition opens at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan

University of Richmond Museums presents "Woman as Image: Museum Studies Seminar Exhibition"

Elizabeth Taylor's gold Cleopatra cape brings $59,375 at Heritage Auctions in Dallas

Birmingham Civil Rights Institute opens exhibition featuring photos of lesbian couples

"Making History: Twentieth Century African American Art" opens at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

New York artist Zoe Leonard transforms Camden Arts Centre into a 'camera obscura'

Antiques 'fit for royalty' to be auctioned April 14-15 at Don Presley's California gallery

Exhibition by Latifa Echakhch and David Maljkovic opens at Kunsthalle Basel

"Beryl Korot: Selected Video Works: 1977 to Present" on view at bitforms gallery

Alejandro Zaera-Polo selected as the next dean of Princeton University's School of Architecture

Exhibition of new works by Agathe Snow opens at Maccarone

What's old is new again: Original glass furnace reconstructed

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Leonardo da Vinci exhibition offers a very rare look at artist's fascination with beauty

2.- The Barnes Foundation discovers two sketches by Paul Cézanne behind watercolors

3.- From dust to digital: Millions of images from the world's endangered archives made available

4.- Exhibition at Kunsthaus Zurich explores Europe’s view of Japan in the 19th century

5.- Gustav Klimt's world-famous painting 'The Lovers' now available as a gigapixel photograph

6.- Belvedere highlights both the political and social aspects of The Congress of Vienna

7.- Crystal Bridges debuts an exhibition of masterworks from the collection of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery

8.- Rarely seen masterpieces from Europe's greatest dynasty on view in Minneapolis

9.- Rouen to open new museum dedicated to tracing the history of French heroine Joan of Arc

10.- Retrospective exhibition of Vivian Maier's photographs opens at Willy-Brandt Haus



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez - Marketing: Carla Gutiérrez
Special Contributor: Liz Gangemi - Special Advisor: Carlos Amador
Contributing Editor: Carolina Farias

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org theavemaria.org juncodelavega.org facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site