The First Art Newspaper on the Net Established in 1996 United States Tuesday, November 25, 2014


As 'Peanuts' Turn 60, Schulz Family Plans Future - More TV Specials and New Film
A portrait of Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz, by photographer Yousuf Karsh, is installed at the National Portrait Gallery, in Washington, on Friday, Oct. 1, 2010. AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin.

By: Brett Zongker, Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP).- Good grief, Charlie Brown. The world has certainly changed since the Peanuts were born.

In 60 years, the U.S. sent a man to the moon, survived the Cold War and now has one of the worst economic funks in decades. All that time, Charles Schulz's imaginary gang has been a fixture of newspaper funny pages and grainy holiday TV specials.

Now, his family is working to keep Snoopy, Lucy and the rest alive for generations to come. A handful of new projects is in the works. The first new animated film in five years is set for release next spring called "Happiness is a Warm Blanket, Charlie Brown." ABC just signed on for five more years of airing Charlie Brown holiday specials. A new social media game began on Facebook and Twitter last month to "Countdown to the Great Pumpkin," and the comic strip has made its way to a popular gaming website for millions of children.

The enduring appeal is no surprise, said Lee Mendelson, who produced the Peanuts films with Schulz for more than 40 years.

Schulz had said "there's always going to be a market for innocence in this country," Mendelson said Friday as a photograph of Schulz at his drawing board was hung at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery in recognition of his impact on the nation. Schulz died in 2000.

"The innocence and the humor that he brought, I think, helped us as a nation through many bad times," Mendelson said.

Peanuts comics, which first appeared in 1950 in the St. Paul Pioneer Press, still appear in 2,200 newspapers in 75 different countries. Newspaper publisher E.W. Scripps Co. sold the licensing unit that controls "Peanuts" and other comics in April to Iconix Brand Group Inc. — a licensing company partially owned by the Schulz family — for $175 million.

Jeannie Schulz, the cartoonist's widow, said she often hears from people at the Charles M. Schulz Museum in Santa Rosa, Calif., about how well the characters reflect their own feelings. That may be a key to the Peanuts' longevity, she said.

"Reading Peanuts got people through really tough times in their childhoods," she said. "I think it's mirroring their feelings that life is tough, knowing somebody else is in the same boat as they — and yet having hope."

A new book out later this month called "The Peanuts Collection" will trace the comic strip's history and how it evolved over time.

Jeannie Schulz said the genius came from her husband's commonsense, Midwest upbringing as the son of a barber in Minnesota who learned to tell stories in his own way. Schulz taught Sunday school and was proud to be a dad. He had an introverted take on the world, and yet was observant of everything around him, she said.

"Until people change. Until they take a pill to become perfect people and all have perfectly balanced personalities ... I think he's given them a touchstone," she said. "He's given them something to let them know that they're all right."

Fantagraphics Books Inc. is producing a series of volumes — each with two years worth of Peanuts comics — to let fans read the strip every day. On Oct. 14, the Peanuts cast also will launch a new "Great Pumpkin Island" on Poptropica, a popular game website for millions of tweens who may be less familiar with Charlie Brown and his friends. And the Peanuts gang has come to life online with Flash-animated comics.

Next year's film will feature new animations created by a team involving Charles Schulz's son, Craig, and "Pearls Before Swine" cartoonist Stephan Pastis. Even with the more modern trappings, though, the animations have maintained their simplistic roots. Jeannie Schulz has said in the past that computer-generated "Peanuts" characters just wouldn't quite look right.

Before establishing a permanent place in Washington with the portrait unveiled last week, Schulz brought his characters to the Smithsonian in 1985 for a visit for a TV series called "This is America, Charlie Brown." Lucy marveled at seeing a comic strip with their names on a museum wall, and Charlie Brown found his name and Snoopy's on the Apollo 10 capsules at the space museum.

Schulz was a history buff and considered himself an Eisenhower Republican, but he mostly stayed away from politics in his cartoons. He included timely issues, though, such as the environment, race, bullying and other themes. But if he visited Washington today, Mendelson said, Schulz would be taken aback by the bitter political tone.

"I think he would be appalled," Mendelson said, "and I think he would have poked fun at it in the comic strip."


Copyright 2010 The Associated Press.

Charles Schulz | 'Peanuts' | Charlie Brown |




Today's News

October 6, 2010

For the First Time Ever, The Museo del Prado Exhibits Treasures from Its Library

Preserved Feathers and Scales of a Giant Penguin Fossil Gives Evolutionary Clues

Damien Hirst Fills the Paul Stolper Gallery with 120 Framed, Foilblock Butterfly Prints

First Exhibition in 45 Years Devoted to Renaissance Master Jan Gossart on View at Metropolitan Museum

Tiny Footprints from Poland Show that First Dinosaurs Walked on Little Cat Feet

Magnificent and Rare Collection of Mezzotints Acquired by the Art Fund for the British Museum

Record Number of Visitors this Summer for the United Kingdom's National Museums

Biennale of Sydney Announces Joint Artistic Directors for 2012: Catherine de Zegher and Gerald McMaster

Robert F. Kennedy-Owned Emancipation Proclamation Up for Auction

Nazi Praise Sparks Switzerland's Rethink of Modernist Architect Le Corbusier

Judd Foundation Announces It will Now Be Represented Exclusively by David Zwirner

Teotihuacan's Emblematic Monument, The Sun Pyramid, Still an Enigma for Archaeologists

£769,250 Achieved at Sotheby's for Rediscovered Paintings Depicting Tipu Sultan's Victory over the British

DeCordova Announces the Rappaport Endowment Fund and the Winner of the 11th Rappaport Prize

Completely Renewed, the National Museum of Cultures to Be Reopened

France 1500: Between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance at the Galeries nationales Grand Palais

New Work by Turner Prize Nominated Artist, Cornelia Parker, Loses Wing in Cuts Campaign

Sotheby's First-Ever Evening Sale of Islamic Art Realises £7 Million - Well Above Pre-Sale Expectations

Important Whistler and Old Master Prints at Swann Galleries' Three-Part Print Auction

The Onassis Cultural Center in New York Explores the Role of Heroes in Society

Portland-based Artist to Exhibit for Art For Arts' Sake Opening of the New Orleans Art Season

As 'Peanuts' Turn 60, Schulz Family Plans Future - More TV Specials and New Film

Sears Wants to Buy Back Willis Tower Sculpture Made by Alexander Calder

First Day of Historic Three-Day Attic Sale at Chatsworth Realises US$7 Million

First Kristin Baker Exhibition in an American Museum Opens at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Sidney Nolan's Antarctic Paintings on Display at the Polar Museum in Cambridge

Baba Bling: The Peranakan Chinese of Singapore at the Musée du Quai Branly

Modern Works by Artist Joan Miró Displayed at Metropolitan Museum with Dutch Old Master Paintings

Sotheby's Hong Kong Fine Chinese 2010 Autumn Sale Fetches US$52.2 Million

Rainer Fetting's "Manscapes", Painted between 1974 and 2010, on View at Kunsthalle Tubingen

Fire Virtually Destroys Southeastern England Landmark 19th-Century Hastings Pier

More than 60 Rare and Unpublished Photographs by Richard Avedon Set for Auction

Maryhill Museum of Art Announces Plans for First Expansion in 70-Year History

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Greece holds breath as skeleton found in Alexander the Great-era tomb at Amphipolis

2.- Spain mourns the death of art collector Cayetana Fitz-James Stuart, Duchess of Alba

3.- Meet the ancestors: Exhibition at Bordeaux gallery reveals faces of prehistoric humans

4.- Getty Foundation and partners launch free of charge online art collection catalogues

5.- Historic photos of dead Cuban revolutionary Che Guevara resurface in small Spanish town

6.- Exhibition showcases the first two 'Poesie' created by Titian following their restoration

7.- O'Keeffe painting sells for more than three times the previous world auction record for any female artist

8.- Crystal Bridges announces the departure of museum President Don Bacigalupi

9.- artnet Auctions offers a later example of Yayoi Kusama's important Infinity-Nets series

10.- 'Degenerate art' should go back to museums: German advisor Jutta Limbach

Related Stories



'Peanuts' creator Charles Schulz' love letters going to auction at Sotheby's in New York



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez - Marketing: Carla Gutiérrez
Special Contributor: Liz Gangemi - Special Advisor: Carlos Amador
Contributing Editor: Carolina Farias

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org theavemaria.org juncodelavega.org facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site