The First Art Newspaper on the Net Established in 1996 United States Friday, August 29, 2014


Modern Science Reveals Secrets of Nelson-Atkins 2,500-Year-Old Mummy
Dr. Thompson was invited to examine the CT scan and X-rays of the Nelson-Atkins mummy, and then he reached out to the ATF for its expertise in composite drawings.
KANSAS CITY, MO.- A powerful image of the face of a 2,500-year-old Egyptian mummy at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art has been created by special agents/forensic artists from the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), as unveiled today at the Museum.

In an unusual collaboration, ATF agents worked with a Kansas City cardiologist and a Nelson-Atkins curator to scientifically analyze the physical characteristics of the mummy, named Ka-i-nefer. The mummy is part of the new Egyptian galleries that opened at the Nelson-Atkins in May.

ATF Special Agents Sharon Whitaker and Robert “Randy” Strode worked more than three months on the project, using a sophisticated computer program known as the Electronic Facial Identification Technique (EFIT) Program. The program is the most realistic and successful composite system available and specializes in facial recognition, identification and training.

“ATF’s mission involves investigating many unique and interesting criminal cases around the world,” said Kenneth Melson, deputy director of ATF. “Our forensic investigators have put their training and specialized skills together to solve another unique – and unprecedented – mystery to unravel the anonymity of a 2,500-year-old mummy. It’s an honor for ATF to be a part of this event that benefits the community and the growth of our society in a way that will have a lasting impact on future generations.”

The public will have the chance to learn about the discoveries in a special presentation 1:30 p.m. and again at 3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 12, in the Museum’s Atkins Auditorium. The program – Face to Face with a Mummy: Unraveling an Egyptian Mystery – is free to the public, with tickets available on the Museum website, www.nelson-atkins.org.

Robert Cohon, curator of ancient art at the Nelson-Atkins, said he was delighted with the results of the ATF agents’ work and the overall analysis of the team, which yielded general information about the mummy. Through modern science, the group determined that Ka-i-nefer was a man who lived to be about 45 to 55 years old, who stood about 5 feet 5 inches and wore size 7 shoes.

“The image by ATF adds a powerful immediacy to this man who lived thousands of years ago in ancient Egypt,” Cohon said. “It is our mission at the Nelson-Atkins to engage visitors, especially children, in connecting to world cultures and great works of art, and this project greatly advances that mission.”

The scientific look at the mummy began at the prompting of Dr. Randall Thompson, a cardiologist at the Mid America Heart Institute in Kansas City, who was part of a team that examined CT scans of 20 mummies housed in the Museum of Antiquities in Cairo, Egypt. The group, including imaging experts, Egyptologists and preservationists, was looking for evidence of heart disease in the ancient Egyptians, and they found hardening of the arteries in mummies as old as 3,500 years. The results were presented in November 2009 at an American Heart Association session.

Dr. Thompson was invited to examine the CT scan and X-rays of the Nelson-Atkins mummy, and then he reached out to the ATF for its expertise in composite drawings. He also collaborated with Dr. Muhammad Al-Tohamy at the Biological Anthropology Department at the National Research Center in Cairo. They noted the mummy’s slight build, good teeth, and a painful bone infection in one of his legs.

“We are honored to have benefitted from such expertise,” said Julián Zugazagoitia, Director & CEO at the Nelson-Atkins. “This sort of marriage between science and art enhances our scholarship and encourages us to pursue future collaborations.”



Today's News

September 10, 2010

Sotheby's London To Hold a Sale of Magnificent Books, Manuscripts and Drawings

Major Presentation of the German Artist Anselm Kiefer at Louisiana

Sotheby's Announces an Exceptional Array of Greek Art this Winter

Christie's to Offer the Magnificent Art Collection of Computing Pioneer Max Palevsky

Curate Your Own Membership: A New Approach to Museum Membership at the Whitney

Artists Protest Looming Cuts to United Kingdom Culture Budget

Radical New Installation by Yoko Ono at Haunch of Venison in Berlin

Tate Liverpool Announces René Magritte: The Pleasure Principle

Cyrus the Great Artifact to Be Displayed in Iran's National Museum

Sotheby's Announces a Special Exhibition in New York

California-Based Artist Ingrid Calame Exhibits at James Cohan Gallery

First Century of Research at Teotihuacan to Be Celebrated

Modern Science Reveals Secrets of Nelson-Atkins 2,500-Year-Old Mummy

Revolution Museum Settles on Philadelphia After 11 Years

Solo Quintet (1897-1979): A New Exhibition by Tim Lee at Lisson Gallery

The Phillips Collection Launches "Give by Cell" Campaign to Support Repairs

Tate Proves Value of Public Investment by Sharing its Collection

10,000 Lives: The Eight Gwangjou Biennale Now Open to the Public

Baghdad, 5 March 2007: A New Display with Jeremy Deller

"Girl with an iPod" is Visitors' Favorite Painting at BP Portrait Award Exhibition

Virginia Philanthropist, Art Collector, Billionaire John Kluge Dies

Sotheby's Announces Contemporary Asian Art Autumn Sale

Scientists Find Fossil of a New Dinosaur that Sports a Noticeable Hump

Tourist Crowds Threaten Vatican's Sistine Chapel Says Vatican Museums Chief

Skeleton of 18th Century Whale Found by Archaeologists in London

Krannert Art Museum Focuses Exhibition on Chicago Imagism

Adi Da Samraj "Orpheus and Linead" Opens at Sundaram Tagore Gallery

Astronomical Observation to Be Held at Tula Archaeological Zone

Co-Owner of Missing Corot Painting Charged with Fraud

Dutch Archive Finds Stock Share from 1606

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Neanderthals and humans were both living in Europe for between 2,600 and 5,400 years

2.- First major exhibition to explore the historical legacy of African cultural astronomy opens at LACMA

3.- Carlo Mollino's idealized vision of the female form in new book published by Damiani/Crump

4.- Tate Britain displays works by Frank Auerbach from the collection of Lucian Freud

5.- In grave robber territory, locals abuzz over Alexander-era tomb; Largest of its kind ever discovered in Greece

6.- Lambert Collection opens an ambitious project housed at the Sainte-Anne Prison

7.- Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore announces the first 18 artists in the CCA Residencies progamme

8.- Historic Kings Theatre is transformed into major New York Performing Arts venue

9.- Thirteen's American Masters Series co-produces new documentary about photographer Dorothea Lange

10.- Sotheby's New York to offer 548 Edward Weston photographs as a single lot this September



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez - Marketing: Carla Gutiérrez
Special Contributor: Liz Gangemi - Special Advisor: Carlos Amador
Contributing Editor: Carolina Farias

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org theavemaria.org juncodelavega.org facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site