The First Art Newspaper on the Net Established in 1996 United States Tuesday, September 2, 2014


Turkey's Culture Minister Announces Discovery of Two Tunnels Leading to Ancient Tomb
Turkish Culture Minister Ertugrul Gunay inspecting an ancient marble coffin inside an underground tomb in Milas, western Turkey. Police raided a house used by people suspected of digging illegally for antiquities and discovered two tunnels leading to the tomb. The Culture Ministry says the coffin is some 2,800 years old and probably belonged to Hecatomnus, who ruled over Milas. AP Photo/Durmus Genc, Anatolian.

By: Suzan Fraser, Associated Press Writer

ANKARA (AP).- Police have raided a house used by people suspected of digging illegally for antiquities and discovered two tunnels leading to an underground tomb that housed an ancient marble coffin and frescoes, officials said Friday.

Culture Minister Ertugrul Gunay described the discovery near the town of Milas, in western Turkey, as an "important archaeological find" and ordered digs in surrounding areas, Haber Turk newspaper reported.

Looting of ancient artifacts is common in Turkey, and the country has imposed heavy penalties to deter illegal digs. But the Milas discovery is the first time in years that authorities have found what could be an important archaeological site while chasing looters.

The 2,800-year-old carved coffin, decorated with reliefs of a bearded reclining man, probably belonged to Hecatomnus, who ruled over Milas, according to Turkey's Culture Ministry.

Several treasures that would have been placed in the underground tomb were most likely looted by the treasure hunters and sold in the illegal antiquities trade, the ministry said.

A court has arrested and charged five of 10 people detained in the raid, the state-run Anatolia news agency reported.

Anatolia, which was allowed to enter the tomb, said the suspects had dug two tunnels — 6 and 8 meters (yards) long, from the house and an adjacent barn, leading to the tomb that is buried some 10 meters (yards) deep.

They used sophisticated equipment to drill through the thick marble walls of the tomb and were working to remove the coffin from the underground chamber when they were detained, according to the Culture Ministry.

"I would have wished that this (archaeological find) had been discovered through our digs and not through digs conducted by a band of treasure hunters," Anatolia quoted Gunay as saying.

"This is not an ordinary treasure hunt. It is very organized and it is obvious that they received economic and scientific help," Gunay said, adding that Turkey also would investigate the suspects possible overseas links.


Copyright 2010 The Associated Press.

Ertugrul Gunay | Milas | Ancient Tomb | Turkey |


Today's News

August 15, 2010

Turkey's Culture Minister Announces Discovery of Two Tunnels Leading to Ancient Tomb

Aperture Foundation Announces New Exhibition: "Paul Strand in Mexico"

Orthodox Flock to Once-Banned Holy Site of Sumela Monastery in Turkey

Josef Koudelka's Testimony of the Prague Invasion Opens in Buenos Aires

The Reassembled Archaeological Collection of Max von Oppenheim

Museum of Contemporary Art Announces "The Art Auction"

Archaeologists Discover the Tomb of a Teenager Buried for Over 1600 Years

In September, All Eyes will Be on Kees van Dongen Exhibition

Seattle Art Museum Presents Behind the Scenes: The Real Story of Quileute Wolves

Titanic Salvage Company Wins Award from Virginia Court

High Museum to Offer Half-Price Tickets for Dalí Exhibition

Iconic Ear Pendants by JAR Highlight Christie's October Jewels Sale

Arkansas Arts Center to Present Exhibition of Mexican Art Since 1910

Sacred Artifacts Returned to Northern California Tribe

Walker Art Center's Senior Graphic Designer Emmet Byrne Promoted to Design Director

Single-Owner Collection of Whimsical Tobacco Jars to Highlight Summer Auction at Bonhams & Butterfields

A Special Exhibition Commemorates the 75th Anniversary of Social Security

Tip: Shepard Fairey Offers Behind-the-Scenes Studio Tour

Ohio-Based Artist Berry van Boekel Exhibits at Country Club

New Amazon Monkey Species Discovered in Colombia

MoMA to Celebrate Experimental Filmmaker Barbara Hammer with Exhibition

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Neanderthals and humans were both living in Europe for between 2,600 and 5,400 years

2.- First major exhibition to explore the historical legacy of African cultural astronomy opens at LACMA

3.- Carlo Mollino's idealized vision of the female form in new book published by Damiani/Crump

4.- Tate Britain displays works by Frank Auerbach from the collection of Lucian Freud

5.- In grave robber territory, locals abuzz over Alexander-era tomb; Largest of its kind ever discovered in Greece

6.- Lambert Collection opens an ambitious project housed at the Sainte-Anne Prison

7.- Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore announces the first 18 artists in the CCA Residencies progamme

8.- Historic Kings Theatre is transformed into major New York Performing Arts venue

9.- Thirteen's American Masters Series co-produces new documentary about photographer Dorothea Lange

10.- Sotheby's New York to offer 548 Edward Weston photographs as a single lot this September



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez - Marketing: Carla Gutiérrez
Special Contributor: Liz Gangemi - Special Advisor: Carlos Amador
Contributing Editor: Carolina Farias

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org theavemaria.org juncodelavega.org facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site