The First Art Newspaper on the Net Established in 1996 United States Thursday, December 18, 2014


Frank Stella Receives the Julio González Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Arts
American painter Frank Stella poses for a photograph today at Institut Valencià d' Art Modern (IVAM) where he received the Julio González Prize. Photo: EFE/Juan Carlos Cárdenas.
VALENCIA.- American painter Frank Stella received the Julio González Prize recognizing his work in the arts and his contributions to Modern art. This is the ninth time that the award has been given out and previous winners have been: Georg Baselitz, Cy Twombly, Eduardo Chillida, Anish Kapoor, Markus Lüpertz, Robert Rauschenberg, Anthony Caro, Pierre Soulages and Miquel Navarro.

Frank Stella was born in Malden, Massachusetts. After attending high school at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, he went on to Princeton University, where he painted, influenced by the abstract expressionism of Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline, and majored in history. Early visits to New York art galleries would prove to be an influence upon his artistic development. Stella moved to New York in 1958 after his graduation. He is one of the most well-regarded postwar American painters who still works today. Frank Stella has reinvented himself in consecutive bodies of work over the course of his five-decade career.

Upon moving to New York City, he reacted against the expressive use of paint by most painters of the abstract expressionist movement, instead finding himself drawn towards the "flatter" surfaces of Barnett Newman's work and the "target" paintings of Jasper Johns. He began to produce works which emphasized the picture-as-object, rather than the picture as a representation of something, be it something in the physical world, or something in the artist's emotional world. Stella married Barbara Rose, later a well-known art critic, in 1961. Around this time he said that a picture was "a flat surface with paint on it - nothing more". This was a departure from the technique of creating a painting by first making a sketch. Many of the works are created by simply using the path of the brush stroke, very often using common house paint.

This new aesthetic found expression in a series of paintings, the Black Paintings (60) in which regular bands of black paint were separated by very thin pinstripes of unpainted canvas. Die Fahne Hoch! (1959) is one such painting. It takes its name ("The Raised Banner" in English) from the first line of the Horst-Wessel-Lied, the anthem of the National Socialist German Workers Party, and Stella pointed out that it is in the same proportions as banners used by that organization. It has been suggested that the title has a double meaning, referring also to Jasper Johns' paintings of flags. In any case, its emotional coolness belies the contentiousness its title might suggest, reflecting this new direction in Stella's work. Stella’s art was recognized for its innovations before he was twenty-five. In 1959, several of his paintings were included in "Three Young Americans" at the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin College, as well as in "Sixteen Americans" at the Museum of Modern Art in New York (60). Stella joined dealer Leo Castelli’s stable of artists in 1959. From 1960 he began to produce paintings in aluminum and copper paint which, in their presentation of regular lines of color separated by pinstripes, are similar to his black paintings. However they use a wider range of colors, and are his first works using shaped canvases (canvases in a shape other than the traditional rectangle or square), often being in L, N, U or T-shapes. These later developed into more elaborate designs, in the Irregular Polygon series (67), for example.

Also in the 1960s, Stella began to use a wider range of colors, typically arranged in straight or curved lines. Later he began his Protractor Series (71) of paintings, in which arcs, sometimes overlapping, within square borders are arranged side-by-side to produce full and half circles painted in rings of concentric color. These paintings are named after circular cities he had visited while in the Middle East earlier in the 1960s. The Irregular Polygon canvases and Protractor series further extended the concept of the shaped canvas.

Stella began his extended engagement with printmaking in the mid-1960s, working first with master printer Kenneth Tyler at Gemini G.E.L. Stella produced a series of prints during the late 1960s starting with a print called Quathlamba I in 1968. Stella's abstract prints in lithography, screenprinting, etching and offset lithography (a technique he introduced) had a strong impact upon printmaking as an art.

In 1967, Stella designed the set and costumes for Scramble, a dance piece by Merce Cunningham. The Museum of Modern Art in New York presented a retrospective of Stella’s work in 1970, making him the youngest artist to receive one. During the following decade, Stella introduced relief into his art, which he came to call “maximalist” painting for its sculptural qualities. Ironically, the paintings that had brought him fame before 1960 had eliminated all such depth. The shaped canvases took on even less regular forms in the Eccentric Polygon series, and elements of collage were introduced, pieces of canvas being pasted onto plywood, for example. His work also became more three-dimensional to the point where he started producing large, free-standing metal pieces, which, although they are painted upon, might well be considered sculpture. After introducing wood and other materials in the Polish Village series (73), created in high relief, he began to use aluminum as the primary support for his paintings. As the 1970s and 1980s progressed, these became more elaborate and exuberant. Indeed, his earlier Minimalism [more] became baroque, marked by curving forms, Day-Glo colors, and scrawled brushstrokes. Similarly, his prints of these decades combined various printmaking and drawing techniques. In 1973, he had a print studio installed in his New York house. In 1976, Stella was commissioned by BMW to paint a BMW 3.0 CSL for the second installment in the BMW Art Car Project. He has said of this project, "The starting point for the art cars was racing livery. In the old days there used to be a tradition of identifying a car with its country by color. Now they get a number and they get advertising. It’s a paint job, one way or another. The idea for mine was that it’s from a drawing on graph paper. The graph paper is what it is, a graph, but when it’s morphed over the car’s forms it becomes interesting, and adapting the drawing to the racing car’s forms is interesting. Theoretically it’s like painting on a shaped canvas."

From the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s, Stella created a large body of work that responded in a general way to Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick. During this time, the increasingly deep relief of Stella’s paintings gave way to full three-dimensionality, with sculptural forms derived from cones, pillars, French curves, waves, and decorative architectural elements. To create these works, the artist used collages or maquettes that were then enlarged and re-created with the aid of assistants, industrial metal cutters, and digital technologies.

In the 1990s, Stella began making free-standing sculpture for public spaces and developing architectural projects. In 1993, for example, he created the entire decorative scheme for Toronto’s Princess of Wales Theatre, which includes a 10,000-square-foot mural. His 1993 proposal for a kunsthalle and garden in Dresden did not come to fruition. In 1997, he painted and oversaw the installation of the 5,000-square-foot "Stella Project" which serves as the centerpiece of the theater and lobby of the Moores Opera House in Houston, TX. His aluminum bandshell, inspired by a folding hat from Brazil, was built in downtown Miami in 2001; a monumental Stella sculpture was installed outside the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Stella’s work was included in several important exhibitions that defined 1960s art, among them the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum’s The Shaped Canvas (1965) and Systemic Painting (1966). His art has been the subject of several retrospectives in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Among the many honors he has received was an invitation from Harvard University to give the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures in 1984. Calling for a rejuvenation of abstraction by achieving the depth of baroque painting, these six talks were published by Harvard University Press in 1986 under the title Working Space.

Stella continues to live and work in New York. He also remains active in protecting the rights for his fellow artists. On June 6, 2008, Stella (with Artists Rights Society president Theodore Feder; Stella is a member artist of the Artists Rights Society) published an Op-Ed for the The Art Newspaper decrying a proposed U.S. Orphan Works law which "remove[s] the penalty for copyright infringement if the creator of a work, after a diligent search, cannot be located."




Valencian Institute of Modern Art | Frank Stella |




Today's News

September 22, 2009

Frank Stella Receives the Julio González Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Arts

Christie's to Sell Early Portrait by Sir Alfred James Munnings Hidden for Nearly a Century

The Stadel Museum will Show the First Monographic Exhibition on Sandro Botticelli

Two Newly-Discovered Still Lifes by Adriaen Coorte To Headline Sotheby's Sale

Frieze Art Fair 2009 Announces Paul McCarthy Work to Remain in Regent's Park for Six Months

CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Opens Exhibition Based on Canonical American Novels

Tate Modern Announces an Exhibition of Photographic Images Made Surreptitiously

The Jewish Museum Presents First Henry J. Leir Prize Awarded to Honor Outstanding Work of Art

Property from the Collection of HRH The Prince George, to be Offered at Christie's

Hood Museum of Art Celebrates its Permanent Collection of Post-1945 Painting and Sculpture

Netwerk Center for Contemporary Art Opens Time as Activity Exhibition

Everson Presents Symposium on Women in Ceramics and the Arts & Crafts Movement

The Aviva Art Award Goes to Little Warsaw, Emese Benczúr Wins the Popular Prize

Ten Years After Robert Blanchon's Death, Fales Library at NYU will Hold First Exhibition

The Morgan to Present Exhibition on the Great - and Enduringly Popular - Novelist Jane Austen

SUSHI Announces Patrick Stewart as Its new Executive Director

Charity Auction 'Art for Africa' Raises 457,450 Pounds at Sotheby's to Benefit 'Africa Foundation' and 'Ikamva Labantu'

Transitland: Video Art from Central and Eastern Europe 1989-2009 on View in Bulgaria

Robert Frank's Groundbreaking Photographs Featured in Major Exhibition Marking 50th Anniversary of The Americans

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- 'Stuart Little' helps lost Hungarian painting come home after nine decades

2.- 23,000 year-old limestone statuette of a woman found by archaeologists in France

3.- 42-year-old Russian tourist fined 20,000 euros for defacing Rome's Colosseum

4.- Archaeologists find ancient coins in enormous tomb at Amphipolis in northern Greece

5.- World's richest resource of Japanese stencils for dyeing samurai kimonos rediscovered

6.- Khan Academy to carry extensive content created by Met Museum based on its world-renowned collection

7.- The Weston Cast Court: Victoria & Albert Museum opens refurbished Italian Cast Court

8.- Six final concept designs for Guggenheim Helsinki Design Competition unveiled

9.- France returns 250 illegally imported antiquities seized by customs officials to Egypt

10.- Exhibition at the Prado Museum explores Goya's extraordinary series of tapestry cartoons

Related Stories



The Valencian Institute for Modern Art shows the recent works of Chinese artist Mou Huang

"Surreal versus Surrealism" exhibition on view at the Valencian Institute of Modern Art

The Valencian Institute of Modern Art Presents Sculptures by Xavier Mascaro     

The Christian Stein Collection: A History of Italian Art at the Valencian Institute of Modern Art

Valencian Institute for Modern Art Celebrates the Career of Ramón Esteve

IVAM Celebrates Formula 1 Grand Prix with Installation by Lorenzo Quinn

Julian Opie Takes His Human Figures to the Valencian Institute for Modern Art

Valencian Institute of Modern Art Opens Exhibition by Ximo Lizana

Pinazo and Watercolour on View at the Valencian Institute of Modern Art

"The Sea as a Pretext" Opens at Valencian Institute for Modern Art



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez - Marketing: Carla Gutiérrez
Special Contributor: Liz Gangemi - Special Advisor: Carlos Amador
Contributing Editor: Carolina Farias

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org theavemaria.org juncodelavega.org facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site