The First Art Newspaper on the Net Established in 1996 United States Thursday, August 28, 2014


Substructure Discovered in Chichen Itza
MEXICO CITY.- Archaeologists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) found a substructure near El Castillo and Templo de los Guerreros, in Chichen Itza, Yucatan, more than 1,000 years old. The construction corresponds to the period previous to the site splendor, between 8th and 9th centuries, and brings in important data regarding Maya urbanism.

This discovery took place during the research project conducted by INAH, which excavations are oriented to know architectonic features, archaeological contexts and information about terrain’s unevenness.

Archaeologist Rafael Cobos, member of INAH Archaeology Council and responsible of the project, informed that works began with the aim of understanding relations and origins of El Castillo, Gran Columnata and Templo de los Guerreros, 3 emblematic buildings at Chichen Itza, excavating the surrounding space to determine their development and architectonic evolution.

To present, 12 linear meters of the substructure have been found. “It was definitively built 100 years before El Castillo or Templo de los Guerreros, directly settled on parent rock; until now, a building corner, a cornice and a slope wall have been identified; the southeastern part might have been discovered as well, but it is not known where does it end or if it has a staircase”.

A great amount of construction filler material used by ancient Maya to level the terrain has been found, as well as 5 different floor levels covered with stucco that reach the base of El Castillo south staircase.

Conservation state of the substructure is good, declared archaeologist Cobos, because it was covered and sealed during Prehispanic times, using limestone and lime. Once sealed, terrain was leveled and covered with a stucco floor, over which the new construction was built.

The possibility of knowing new architectonic groups such as this substructure would reveal that ancient dwellers were constantly looking forward to outstand from other social groups for political, economic or social reasons.

The finding was not casual, it responds to an excavation program that parts from topographical register and excavation units, in which 4 by 2 meter wells have been dug, with 4 meters depth. Excavations will continue until September 2009.

Cobos concluded that research continues in a yard-gallery at structure 2D6, to the north of Templo de los Guerreros, as well as the reconstruction of the great wall that surrounds the great level of the archaeological zone.

National Institute of Anthropology and History | Chichen Itza | Yucatan | Templo de los Guerreros | Archaeologist | Rafael Cobos |


Today's News

July 25, 2009

Sotheby's to Sell Property from the Legendary Collections of Dr. Arthur M. Sackler

Victoria & Albert Museum Launches Furniture Futures: An International Design Symposium

San Francisco to Celebrate Hundredth Year of Futurist Manifesto

de Young Museum to Open New Permanent Exhibition in Art of the Americas Galleries

Rare Roman Coins Acquired for British Museum and Derby with Art Fund Help

Asian Art Scholar Colin C. Mackenzie Named Senior Curator of Early Chinese Art

Two New Exhibits Open at UC Santa Barbara's University Art Museum

New Photography Series by Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao Celebrates the Bronx

Digital Information and Communication Technology Used in New Exhibition Organized by the Louvre

Kandinsky Prize: Russia's Most Prestigious Contemporary Art Award Comes to London

California in Relief: A History in Wood and Linocut Prints at Hearst Art Gallery

The Akron Art Museum Presents Familiar Faces: Chuck Close in Ohio Collections

Seattle Art Museum's Asian Art Masterpieces Tour Japan

Amon Carter Museum Announces Teacher and School Programs Manager

New York Harbor Quadricentennial Saluted with Extensive Exhibition Featuring Rarely Seen Treasures

Substructure Discovered in Chichen Itza

Columbus Museum to Show Now and Then: Snapshots of the South

aRtPM: a Student Graffiti Art Exhibition Moves Street Art into the Museum

Most Popular Last Seven Days



1.- Mystery over massive Alexander the Great-era tomb unearthed in northern Greece

2.- An ancient money box containing a large rare hoard of coins found in Israel

3.- Robin Williams' portrait installed today at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington

4.- The Baltimore Museum of Art announces three new contemporary exhibitions in fall

5.- New Aspen Art Museum designed by architect Shigeru Ban opens to the public

6.- New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art launches 82nd & Fifth app in 12 languages

7.- MoMA online-only publication features new research on Pablo Picasso and Cubism

8.- Volunteers needed for massive Smithsonian digitization project

9.- Tate Britain welcomes home John Everett Millais's Ophelia and Rossetti’s The Beloved

10.- Bogart estate: Hollywood golden age icon Lauren Bacall dead at 89 in New York

Related Stories



Archaeologists find Maya ceramics and mural paintings in three underwater caves in Mexico

Pedro Ramirez Vazquez

Mexican archaeologists find Aztec temple platform at Mexico City's Templo Mayor ruin

Mexican Funerary Masks Travel to France for Exhibition at the Pinacothèque de Paris

Two Pyramids at Santo Nombre Archaeological Site were Restored by INAH

Mexican Archaeologists Say Tonina Ballgame Court may Be the One Described in Popol Vuh

Mexican Archaeologists Report Finding Prehispanic Objects at Nevado de Toluca

Archaeologists Discover Two More Human Skeletons Accompanied by a Rich Offering

Archaeologists Discover Two More Human Skeletons Accompanied by a Rich Offering at Chiapa de Corzo

Drawings and Sketches that Reflect Mexico's Independence Period Published



Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 

Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr.
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez - Marketing: Carla Gutiérrez
Special Contributor: Liz Gangemi - Special Advisor: Carlos Amador
Contributing Editor: Carolina Farias

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org theavemaria.org juncodelavega.org facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site